I expect boos and hisses but--as a newbie to HLA coming from MASM--I find Visual Studio .NET to be an acceptable IDE. It just takes defining a few "External Tools". For now, WinDBG will do as a debugger under VS.NET so having HLA generate MASM code is an advantage until another debugger comes along.
Posted on 2003-01-31 06:56:36 by benanne12

I expect boos and hisses but--as a newbie to HLA coming from MASM--I find Visual Studio .NET to be an acceptable IDE. It just takes defining a few "External Tools". For now, WinDBG will do as a debugger under VS.NET so having HLA generate MASM code is an advantage until another debugger comes along.


The thing about any IDE is that it is a personal choice.
Boos and Hisses are reserved for those who insist that others must use *their* choice for such tools.

Definitely, plans for incorporating HLA directly into VS is part of the HLA v2.0 plan, assuming I can figure out the MS debugging info protocol. Just too many happy VS users out there to ignore (and VS isn't a bad IDE at all).

On the debugger front, expect OllyDbg to support HLA in the next release.
I've been playing around with a pre-release version for HLA and it's fantastic.
Randy Hyde
Posted on 2003-02-01 01:38:04 by rhyde
Randy,

I think you have to be a licensee under VSIP to get access to "integrate" anything into VS IDE. There wasn't an open partner program for the old VS 6, but VS.NET has an open licensing program. From what I understand it's $10k per year and requires a 3 year committment paid up front. I know, I tried to license so I can add MASM editor into it.

The good news is, if you are only going to do it in-house and will never "market", "distribute", or "license" it, you can use it free, if you are already a VOLUME or SELECT customer.


Thanks,
_Shawn
Posted on 2003-02-21 16:29:53 by _Shawn

Randy,

I think you have to be a licensee under VSIP to get access to "integrate" anything into VS IDE. There wasn't an open partner program for the old VS 6, but VS.NET has an open licensing program. From what I understand it's k per year and requires a 3 year committment paid up front. I know, I tried to license so I can add MASM editor into it.

The good news is, if you are only going to do it in-house and will never "market", "distribute", or "license" it, you can use it free, if you are already a VOLUME or SELECT customer.


Thanks,
_Shawn


Typical Microsoft nonsense. Expect it to be free within a year or two after they extract the few bucks from rich companies that don't care and then sales fall to nothing.
The real trick is to provide a tool that lets each individual user "integrate" it themselves.
Of course, there are enough other options other there that if MS decides to get hard-nosed about this, we can gently ignore them :-)
Posted on 2003-02-21 20:23:43 by rhyde
Dear Randy,

I have VS.NET. You can add external tools to it. Since Visual C++ can be used to create unmanaged code in VS.NET, MASM is included in the package. I'm too tired to try to see if I can get HLA added to VS.NET and have it assemble and link the output tonight. I'll let you know if I am successful in doing so. I do know that you can copy the MASM version supplied with VS.NET to the HLA directory and get it to work directly.:alright:

Charles
Posted on 2003-02-25 00:02:35 by cdquarles
How to add HLA to Visual Studio.NET

Add HLA to the Tools menu by clicking on Tools then External Tools. In the dialog box that opens, click Add. Enter the Title that you want to appear in the Tools menu (eg. HLA). Enter the location of HLA on your machine either directly or browse to it. Enter the desired command line arguments. Click the check box "Use Output Window" and "Prompt for arguments" as desired. I did both so that you can see the output of the compile process in the VS.NET IDE and so that I can enter the correct file path and file name. This is tedious but it works. If someone else finds an easier way, please drop a line. I used the -c option so that I could then continue in the VS.NET IDE. I could not get it to work with the default or -v options. The IDE would call the wrong linker and I couldn't find a way to fix that.

Next, add an external tool to link the .obj file you just made. Repeat the previous steps, entering the desired Title (ie Link HLA), enter the command line arguments, and click the check boxes for "Use Output Window" and "Prompt for arguments" as desired. I did both so that you can see the link process output in the IDE and to confirm the command line arguments before linking.

Finally, you can add a "Run Executable" and "Debug Executable" tool(s) as desired.

Charles D. Quarles
Posted on 2003-02-26 17:09:35 by cdquarles
Here's another IDE option for HLA users.
This one is based on the Ultra-Edit32 shareware package:
http://uemake.cjb.net/

Cheers,
Randy Hyde
Posted on 2003-03-25 22:26:55 by rhyde