Hi, I am 1 and a half months into a 2nd semester in Gr. 11 chemistry, although I understand most of the concepts my marks are pretty low in the class, therefore I am considering Software Engineering, it will be pretty boring, but in the end I may enjoy the job (but damn I want to do hardware so bad!!). Anyways I was wondering what is the difference between Software Engineering and Computer Science? I believe Comp Sci people are more into the software development and are not interested in the low level hardware programming, but the Software Engineers are well versed in both areas of programming is my believe true?
Posted on 2003-03-27 20:07:35 by x86asm
From my experiences (observing friends in both fields), com-sci people are 'marathon coders', while software eng people are more development and design people. At my school they taught the basics of hardware electronics to soft-eng's but never got beyond grade 1 electrical (basic LRC cirucuts). Com-sci students never see any of this. As well their math abilities are far less.

Basically in short, from what i know, com-sci people work for companies making the office run better (ie building 'tools' for office work). While com-eng people are developing new software technologies for companies (network protocols, encryption engines, etc.).

:NaN:
Posted on 2003-03-27 21:19:51 by NaN
Computer Science usually refers to the art of programming (algorithms, data structures, logic , etc.).

Software Engineering encompasses Computer Science but is more focused on the programming process (defining specifications, procedures for the development and testing processes, documenting the process, etc.), especially as related to large applications programmed by multiple programmers or teams.
Posted on 2003-03-27 21:41:26 by Berninhell
I agree with NaN, I did a year of college as a programmer analyst(3 year course). Our classes made up vb, Cobol, accounting, and business math (such as calculating annuities, etc). The course was a total bore and I never found anyone that actually cared about programming...

James
Posted on 2003-03-27 21:52:04 by JamesE
A lot of compsci people are programmers but, technically I think, one deals with the science of computing while the other deals with the application of programming. That is, one studies coding methods and the other uses those methods.

Just like there are scientists that invent things like transistors and lasers and the engineers that use the them in products.
Posted on 2003-03-28 09:56:48 by drhowarddrfine
Previously coming from a CS degree (now engineering), I would have to say that NaN is about dead on accurate. CS was more of a "code till you drop" enviornment, where deadlines meant working code was more important than "proper" code, and in large parts looking back often meant seeing the solution was totally inappropriate for the problem (even if it "worked"). There were a lot of discussions about algorithms, complexity, and generally theory, but I can't remember at any point actually being taught how to actually analyze the problem in a way that would result in a well-designed solution.

As for low-level / high-level, CS tends more to focus on abstraction away from the machine, while the general engineering focus IS the machine.

At any rate, I belive engineers in general tend to be better programmers, and better suited/better prepared to handle any type of problem to which they might encounter... but thats just my take on it...

-----
Domain
Posted on 2003-03-28 19:29:16 by Domain
Hmmm okay im 16 and almost through my 11th grade year. And i wanted to get into Computer Engineering , but from what people told me all they did was set up networks for companies and all other hardware-only oriented task(im assuming now these were all lies). They insisted that Computer Science was the way to go if i wanted to program. So is there a big difference between computer engineering and computer science? and also what exactly does a Computer Engineer learn that a Computer Science major doesn't? At the moment i have sent to many colleges(i.e. Carnegie Mellon, Rochester Institute of Technology and etc.) that i would like to major in computer engineering, but at the moment i am very sceptical on which road to take...:confused:
Posted on 2003-03-28 21:00:13 by Guy on ASM

Hmmm okay im 16 and almost through my 11th grade year. And i wanted to get into Computer Engineering , but from what people told me all they did was set up networks for companies and all other hardware-only oriented task(im assuming now these were all lies). They insisted that Computer Science was the way to go if i wanted to program. So is there a big difference between computer engineering and computer science? and also what exactly does a Computer Engineer learn that a Computer Science major doesn't? At the moment i have sent to many colleges(i.e. Carnegie Mellon, Rochester Institute of Technology and etc.) that i would like to major in computer engineering, but at the moment i am very sceptical on which road to take...:confused:


I see you are in the same position I am, welcome to the club friend :)
Posted on 2003-03-28 21:13:05 by x86asm

Previously coming from a CS degree (now engineering), I would have to say that NaN is about dead on accurate. CS was more of a "code till you drop" enviornment, where deadlines meant working code was more important than "proper" code, and in large parts looking back often meant seeing the solution was totally inappropriate for the problem (even if it "worked"). There were a lot of discussions about algorithms, complexity, and generally theory, but I can't remember at any point actually being taught how to actually analyze the problem in a way that would result in a well-designed solution.

As for low-level / high-level, CS tends more to focus on abstraction away from the machine, while the general engineering focus IS the machine.

At any rate, I belive engineers in general tend to be better programmers, and better suited/better prepared to handle any type of problem to which they might encounter... but thats just my take on it...

-----
Domain


That's what I thought I was thinking that I maybe should go into EE or CE (whichever lets me play with microprocessors and DSP's), because I think I have the programming part of microprocessors and other digital "brains" down and I can develop software to interact with the outside world, so to go thru a class that teaches me something I already know is a waste of money. Wouldn't it be a good idea to do in my situation?
Posted on 2003-03-28 21:24:52 by x86asm



That's what I thought I was thinking that I maybe should go into EE or CE (whichever lets me play with microprocessors and DSP's), because I think I have the programming part of microprocessors and other digital "brains" down and I can develop software to interact with the outside world, so to go thru a class that teaches me something I already know is a waste of money. Wouldn't it be a good idea to do in my situation?


But it seems my chemistry mark may not allow me to go in that direction
Posted on 2003-03-28 21:35:14 by x86asm
Hey!

Dont get too bent on high school! REALY!

Do work hard.. and make the grades you need.. dont stop this, but i do want to let you know there is more than one avenue to post-secondary education.

Myself, i was an acid dropppin pot-head in high school (seriously). I was in high school for 6 years.. accumulated approximately 60% of what was required for university.. and after years of wood-shop, was forced to graduate high school. Seeing no other avenue i went to college and took Electrical Control Systems Engineering Technology.

Since i was now paying for school, i cleaned myself up, and graduated top of my class after three years of what i still reflect on as my best school experiences to date. Having college and new "learning skills" under the belt, i applied and was accepted to university. And i finished a bachelors of Electrical Enginering with Honors, in university! (who woulda thunk!).

So my point is. If you have good effort and modest grades now, (more than my pot-smoking days of blissfull ignorance ever did), you can get into any program you want.. all you need to do is be dedicated to your intent and not sell your self out pre-maturely!

Stick to your goals, and dont let some "guidence councler" sell any propaganda! After all, at the end of the day its your name on the paper, not theirs!

Best of luck!
:NaN:
Posted on 2003-03-29 01:39:53 by NaN
Folks, be sure you are clear on what type of engineering you are talking about. Computer Engineering is very different from Software Engineering.

I graduated with a degree in Computer Science and Software Engineering was a course required for my degree. My university did not offer a separate degree for Software Engineering, but some Universities do.

You will usually have the ability to study for a year or two at a major (4-year) university before you have to choose which degree you really want. CompE/EE/CS all have a large overlap in the basic prerequisite courses.

The last time I checked, the job markets for programmers (CS) was more robust than the market for hardware specialists (CompE/EE). YMMV...
Posted on 2003-03-29 08:10:21 by Berninhell
so Computer Engineers dont excel in software & hardware? just hardware...:(
Posted on 2003-03-29 10:36:23 by Guy on ASM

Hey!

Dont get too bent on high school! REALY!

Do work hard.. and make the grades you need.. dont stop this, but i do want to let you know there is more than one avenue to post-secondary education.

Myself, i was an acid dropppin pot-head in high school (seriously). I was in high school for 6 years.. accumulated approximately 60% of what was required for university.. and after years of wood-shop, was forced to graduate high school. Seeing no other avenue i went to college and took Electrical Control Systems Engineering Technology.

Since i was now paying for school, i cleaned myself up, and graduated top of my class after three years of what i still reflect on as my best school experiences to date. Having college and new "learning skills" under the belt, i applied and was accepted to university. And i finished a bachelors of Electrical Enginering with Honors, in university! (who woulda thunk!).

So my point is. If you have good effort and modest grades now, (more than my pot-smoking days of blissfull ignorance ever did), you can get into any program you want.. all you need to do is be dedicated to your intent and not sell your self out pre-maturely!

Stick to your goals, and dont let some "guidence councler" sell any propaganda! After all, at the end of the day its your name on the paper, not theirs!

Best of luck!
:NaN:



Thanks for the motivation its just what I needed , much thanks Not-A-Number :)
Posted on 2003-03-29 10:49:31 by x86asm

Folks, be sure you are clear on what type of engineering you are talking about. Computer Engineering is very different from Software Engineering.

I graduated with a degree in Computer Science and Software Engineering was a course required for my degree. My university did not offer a separate degree for Software Engineering, but some Universities do.

You will usually have the ability to study for a year or two at a major (4-year) university before you have to choose which degree you really want. CompE/EE/CS all have a large overlap in the basic prerequisite courses.

The last time I checked, the job markets for programmers (CS) was more robust than the market for hardware specialists (CompE/EE). YMMV...


I know you are definately correct, but I am more interested in the hardware portion of computers, so I feel it will be a more interesting course for me :)
Posted on 2003-03-29 10:50:46 by x86asm

so Computer Engineers dont excel in software & hardware? just hardware...:(


Well Computer Engineers, in some places (previously mentioned on this forum) are more like Software Engineers (NaN was it u who mentioned this?) They don't know much about the circuitry but were the ones that did the programming of the firmware and etc. That is why I will go for EE as first choice instead of CE.
Posted on 2003-03-29 10:52:47 by x86asm