Here is some basic electrical symbols that are used in practice to design and represent electrical circuits:
Posted on 2003-04-09 18:56:17 by NaN
Likewise, this may also be some use to people (especially for Capasitance and Inductance discussions):
Posted on 2003-04-09 19:08:47 by NaN
Here you go :grin: . There is also many anagrams for this, one i remember is:
Bad, Boys, Rape, Our, Yonge, Girls, But, Violet, Goes, Willing
Black, Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet, Grey, White
Posted on 2003-04-12 18:19:20 by NaN
anagram?

I can't wait for the left hand rule 'anagram'.
Posted on 2003-04-15 14:26:10 by alpha
Sometimes you may find resistors with a fifth color band. The fifth color band is a MIL SPEC or military specification that designates reliablity level per 1,000 hours of operation.

The fifth color band works as follows:

Fifth band color Level
------------------------------
Brown 1.0%
Red 0.1%
Orange 0.01%
Yellow 0.001%


So if a resistor has a fifth band color coded brown then the resistor's chance of failure will not exceed 1% for every thousand hours of operation.
Posted on 2003-04-19 18:04:47 by alpha
Actually I don't like --/\/\/\/-- resistor symbol. IMHO it is antique. Only americans continuing to use it, but they use inches and foots too. :grin:
Simple rectangle is more useable and clear - like "impedance" symbol in the above picture, but without "z" sign.
Posted on 2003-04-25 07:49:33 by JohnFound
am.. about resistor calculation .

i wrote a program while ago , that calculates for you .
but i have a mistake in the 4 color and never had the time to fix that.


bye

eko
Posted on 2003-04-25 10:43:49 by eko
Hey eko,

Care to share the source? I think there are quite a number of bugs to mop up. :grin:
Posted on 2003-09-11 04:16:06 by roticv

Sometimes you may find resistors with a fifth color band. The fifth color band is a MIL SPEC or military specification that designates reliablity level per 1,000 hours of operation.

The fifth color band works as follows:

Fifth band color Level
------------------------------
Brown 1.0%
Red 0.1%
Orange 0.01%
Yellow 0.001%


So if a resistor has a fifth band color coded brown then the resistor's chance of failure will not exceed 1% for every thousand hours of operation.


Yep... I worked with this before :)

The fifth color band is more of a visual for determining if it is a resistor cheaply made by the lowest bidder (military) or a semi-quality product (civilian)... the reliability factor isn't even considered :tongue:



Actually I don't like --/\/\/\/-- resistor symbol. IMHO it is antique. Only americans continuing to use it, but they use inches and foots too. :grin:
Simple rectangle is more useable and clear - like "impedance" symbol in the above picture, but without "z" sign.


It's "inches and feet". The only thing I really agree to still using is the Fahrenheit for determining outside temperatures since is it relative to the human condition. 0 degress... it is too cold to go outside, 100 degrees... it is too hot to go outside. Otherwise I have used nothing but mostly metric for the work I am doing.

A problem with the rectangular box is that we use similiar looking stuff for other components, components your countries may have not conceived yet :tongue:

There is a neat little table for transistor amplifer determination I've learned :)

Common Type


B E C - Configuration
V P I - Best Gain
A B G - Best "I" Gain
L M H - Input Impedence
H M L - Output Impedence
I O I - Phase


I'm not sure if any of you know this besides NaN. The first line is common type determination (Base/Emitter/Collector) and the next lines are characteristics of each type. Anyways...

Bob Eats Christine's
Virgin P***y In
A Big Garage
Licking Mostly Her
Hot Moist Lips
In Out In
Posted on 2003-09-28 13:58:43 by SpooK
Well yes and no... never heard of the anagram, but i have definitely been down all three roads before... Thanks for sharing, i dont think i will forget that for a while ;)

Btw: I get most of the table, but the 2nd and 3rd lines are very unclear:

Voltage - ??? - Current ??
Average - Bad - Good ??
Low - Med - High
High - Med - Low
In - Out - In

???
:NaN:
Posted on 2003-09-29 19:45:09 by NaN
Base, Emitter, Collector
Voltage, Power, Current
Alpha, Beta, Gamma
Low, Medium, High
High, Medium, Low
In, Out, In
Posted on 2003-09-29 22:38:45 by SpooK
Hi NaN.

In TABLE 1-3 the following are Greek names:

Tera,giga,mega,kilo,deka,micro,nano.

Tera=huge,giga=giant,mega=great,kilo=thousand,deka=ten,micro=micro,nano=dwarf.

Why you don't put your custom control Tutorial in Custom Controls Forum ?

Manos.
Posted on 2003-10-15 12:08:52 by Anonymous
I prefer rectangles over squiggly lines, also. I made a font that is all rectangles. My rectanglabet is much easier to memorize than the alphabet.

What's wrong with inches and feet... I mean foots? The English measuring system is not more or less accurate than the metric system, is it? Do metric countries use centiliters instead of teaspoons & tablespoons? Teaspoons and tablespoons have no clearly defined standard. Just curious what you are using over there. And what measuring system does the pinch belong in (hope your country isn't using that one)?
Posted on 2005-01-28 17:51:16 by gluespill
And who started this thing with nano-farads? It was mirco-farads and pico-farads forever, and then all of the sudden you see nano-farads in between the other two on schematics with rectangles instead of squiggly lines.
Posted on 2005-01-28 17:57:55 by gluespill