I have finally got RedHat Linux 8.0 :)
But there are a few confusions while installing it, expecially concerning partitions.

Before i get on with it let me explain a bit abt my hdd.
I have a 20 gig hdd divided into 4 equal partitions of about 4.8 gb each.
I have 3 OS installed and the hd looks like this-

C: -- Win98
D: -- WinXp
E: ------>This is where i want to install Linux
F: -- Win2k

I have a tnt2 card and a vibra128 sound card and 128 mb ram. Are there any special linux drivers available for them?

Also my computer vendor (the guy who sold me the comp) was at my place a few days ago (to install a network card) and he said that linux cannot be installed on between 2 partitions and if i try to do so, i will lose the other os. He said either i will have to format the whole hdd or buy a new hd.

Is this true? Cant i install linux on my E: ?
This is the first time i am dealing with all this partition and stuff.

Also, i see that in the install process linux lists the partitions as "/dev/hda0"
i know that the first "/" stands for root diretory and "/hda0" stands for the first partition on the hd, then what does "/dev" stand for ?
Also if i copy anything to the root directory,ie, "/" where does it get copied to, as "/" is not the hd?
Or am i completly wrong and confused about this stuff?

Btw, the grpahical installer of redhat looks amazing. Probably the best i have ever seen, much better than the 'blue' winxp installer. Hope the rest of linux looks the same :)
Posted on 2003-04-11 06:27:40 by clippy
Let me try to answer your questions.

>I have finally got RedHat Linux 8.0 :)

RedHat 9.0 is current :grin:

>C: -- Win98
>D: -- WinXp
>E: ------>This is where i want to install Linux
>F: -- Win2k

>Also my computer vendor (the guy who sold me the comp) was at my place a few
>days ago (to install a network card) and he said that linux cannot be installed on
>between 2 partitions and if i try to do so, i will lose the other os. He said either i
>will have to format the whole hdd or buy a new hd.

He may be right.

Are these 4 partitions all formated as primary partitions?
If yes, how much RAM do you have?

Linux uses a extra partition for swap instead of a swap file like under Windows.
If you have enough RAM (depends what Desktop Environment you want to run, but 256MB+ would be fine) you dont need a swap partition and it would work fine with that single free partition. Else you need to put everything in an extended partition and I dont know if you can put one between the second and fourth partition.

>I have a tnt2 card and a vibra128 sound card and 128 mb ram. Are there any >special linux drivers available for them?

As for the TNT2, it will work without problems and RedHat will autodetect it for sure. About the sound card... I never heard of this one but if its a older one it will work too. Only the newest Soundblaster Audigy do cause some problems...
Well and here comes the RAM part (I didnt read your whole posting before replying). 128 MB... you can try it, but I doubt it will be quite fast if you run something bloated as KDE (except you add a swap partition). Gnome is more lightwight than KDE so I would try Gnome first. (I personally use Fluxbox :) ).

>Also, i see that in the install process linux lists the partitions as "/dev/hda0"
>i know that the first "/" stands for root diretory and "/hda0" stands for the first >partition on the hd, then what does "/dev" stand for ?

"/" is the root directory.
"/dev" is a directory containing device files.
"/dev/hda" is the first disk on the first IDE controller.
"/dev/hda0" must be wrong as the naming starts with hda1 for the first partition.
(or hda0 is an alias for hda)

>Also if i copy anything to the root directory,ie, "/" where does it get copied to,
>as "/" is not the hd?

To explain it Windows like:

"/" is your "C:\" (the "directory")
whereas "/dev/hda1" is a file which contains a symlink to the partition where C:\ lays, but not to the root directory.

>Or am i completly wrong and confused about this stuff?

Yes.
I would suggest you to read that link to get some more detailed information about the Linux directory structure: http://www.tuxfiles.org/linuxhelp/linuxdir.html

>Hope the rest of linux looks the same :)

I installed the 8.1 Beta of RedHat a few weeks ago and I like their default desktop theme for Gnome "BlueCurve" :)
Posted on 2003-04-11 06:53:15 by bazik
Are these 4 partitions all formated as primary partitions?

No C: is primary. D,E & F are on extended partition

All partitions are Fat32
Posted on 2003-04-11 07:27:42 by clippy
Bazik,
Where are you?

So whats the answer? Can i not install linux on extended partitions? If not then how come winXp and Win2k get installed and work?
Posted on 2003-04-12 09:15:42 by clippy

Bazik,
Where are you?

So whats the answer? Can i not install linux on extended partitions? If not then how come winXp and Win2k get installed and work?


You can. But I cant set up a test machine to try it out for you. So just try it yourself.
Posted on 2003-04-12 09:23:06 by bazik
Ok, no problem.
Thanks for the help anyway:)
Posted on 2003-04-12 09:45:23 by clippy
Hello gladiator,


If you can, reformat the drive, unless you had many ram bytes, you need a swap partition, now i don't know about win XP but I know win 9X and 2K can reside in the same partition, ( and the boot code let you choose wich one to boot) so I advice to put your wins in one partition ( or two if win 9X/2K can coexist ) and make the hoter two for swap and linux fs, I had done this for my machine, but I still had problems, LILO didn't install in the MBR, so i had to make a boot disk, and I had to make the swap and filesystem first, next i created (With fdisk) the windows partition, instaled windows, and next linux,
It went OK exept for the boot disk, maybe is because I had an old version of red hat, (ver 6) peraps a 8 or 9 let you install lilo in MBR of big HD

Luck

carlos
Posted on 2003-04-12 15:20:09 by Carlos
here is a file kit that will let you boot linux from windows
this works on windows 95 it may have to be updated for others
if so there is an email address in the readme of where to get an
updateed version
Posted on 2003-04-25 22:25:13 by rob.rice
Sorry for my disappearing off the forum for a while. I am having problems with my inet connection (yet again).

rob.rice,
Thanks for the file kit but i have managed to successfully install linux w/o any booting problems and i am using grub. So i am pretty fine with my current boot setup atleast. But thanks for taking the pain to post this here.

Thanks everyone else too, including bazik. :)

Btw, i am still having some MAJOR problems with linux. I am creating a different thread for that "Major problems with using linux".
Posted on 2003-05-09 03:07:16 by clippy
swap partition... I thought linux could use swap files, too? I personally use a swap partition since, well, that's what I've always been using under linux. But can't linux (at least recent kernels) handle file backed swap?

All that multiple OS stuff... aaah, vmware is nice.
Posted on 2003-05-09 03:22:20 by f0dder
Yes linux can use a swap file but it is complex to set up the
swap file has to be set up as a loop back file system and
formated as a swap partion would be the worst thing about
it is the translation from one file system to another is slower
than a swap partion would be
Posted on 2003-05-09 12:51:44 by rob.rice
If it's just setting up a loopback, that isn't too complex.
Also, iirc the changelogs say using a swap file is about same speed as a dedicated partition now.
Posted on 2003-05-09 12:54:03 by f0dder

If it's just setting up a loopback, that isn't too complex.
Also, iirc the changelogs say using a swap file is about same speed as a dedicated partition now.


the complex part is makeing the swap file in the first place it has
to be a file with all zeros so a script has to be writen to copy a bunch of zeros
from /dev/nul to the file then it has to be mounted loop then formated swap
then put in fstab amd mounted after "/"

you would still have to run the boot fsck with out swap space probly not much
of a problem

Not A Job For A Newbie
Posted on 2003-05-09 15:29:59 by rob.rice
Well, this is how my partitions are.
There was an option to auto-partition the free space while installing , so i selected that and it made 3 new partitions on it with ext3 fs like this-

/dev/hda6 -- 200 mb -- boot partition

/dev/hda7/ -- arnd 4gb -- the main partition
/dev/hda8/ -- 255mb -- swap partition


Is this fine?
Also in kde when i type "/dev/hda7/" in its file browser, it says it cannot open up such a location. why?
Posted on 2003-05-14 07:57:58 by clippy
The partitions you set up look ok. I only use 10MB for the boot.

/dev/hda7 is a device file. It's mounted as / and thats how you access it.
Posted on 2003-05-15 02:04:05 by eet_1024

Well, this is how my partitions are.
There was an option to auto-partition the free space while installing , so i selected that and it made 3 new partitions on it with ext3 fs like this-

/dev/hda6 -- 200 mb -- boot partition

/dev/hda7/ -- arnd 4gb -- the main partition
/dev/hda8/ -- 255mb -- swap partition


Is this fine?
Also in kde when i type "/dev/hda7/" in its file browser, it says it cannot open up such a location. why?


because it is already open and mounted as "/"
Posted on 2003-05-15 10:29:07 by rob.rice
A better explanation is that "/dev/hda7" is a device - you want to open a folder. Ie, in windows, you wouldn't want to open "harddrive 0" or (in the case of /dev/hda7) "extended partition #whatever") - you want to open c:\ or h:\ .
Posted on 2003-05-15 10:37:49 by f0dder
you can open a divce in linux BUT don't count on being able to make sence out of what you find it is after all just a file as far as linux sees it

unless it is busy like mounted as something then it is already open
Posted on 2003-05-16 21:17:48 by rob.rice