http://www.rickard.gunee.com/projects/video/pic/gamesys.php

personnally i really interested to this TV stuff, and plan to do this with 8051 processor, but unfortunately it didnt have internal adc/dac.
Posted on 2003-05-18 06:57:15 by dion
I once tried to make something similar with a Atmel RISC processor (AT90S2313, 10mips at 10Mhz). I've played with simple electronics when I was a kid but I haven't got much experience with electronics in general. However I did manage to write a program for it that looked like pong. I used a simple resistor DAC like on the site you posted, I did add two transistors as well later because I had blown up one of the microcontrollers the first time when I didn't use them.
It showed a simple square ball and two rectangles at both sides of the screen, the ball did bounce on all sides and the two 'players' automatically moved so they would always catch the ball. You couldn't control anything yet so it wasn't much of a game :). I never continued with it, it took quite some time each time I needed to program the microcontroller again, I had made my own programmer and simple software for it but I had to take out the chip of the circuit and put it in the programmer. Luckily Atmel's programming software had a simulator so I could get the timing correct without having to try it out each time.
The timing was very critical, even a single instruction could waste a few millimeters of screen pixels.
Still, it was fun to see it actually worked and that the chip was fast enough to render an image at 50fps in software :).

Thomas
Posted on 2003-05-18 07:36:08 by Thomas
thanks Thomas, no wonder you are so clever now since you're playing with electronic from kids, while i'm not :(

my guess was right. this not gonna surprised anyone :(
frankly i really, yes, *really* interested in this stuff and being dl-ing all related thing on the web. i know something that old in abroad is a new stuff in my country. besides, i want to learn all thing detaily. is it was so dead easy, that noone put his flames or whatever here? oh.... me stupid :(
Posted on 2003-05-20 06:02:54 by dion
As an educational project, it looks like fun. As a game it will be kinda lame. The C64 controller is what, 70;s? 80's technology?

You'll put a ton of effort into it, and none of your friends will go 'WOW.'

But you'll still be the better for building it.
Posted on 2003-05-20 07:00:42 by Ernie
Afternoon, dion.

I don't think people thought it was a stupid project. Quite the contrary. It looks like a neat little project to get stuck into:tongue: .

However, I'd imagine a lot of people here are only just starting up getting into electronics (either learning from stratch, or rejuvenating what they did ages ago).

It's just going to take a little while before more people are up to speed enough to really do a project like that.

Cheers,
Scronty
Posted on 2003-05-20 07:03:53 by Scronty

As an educational project, it looks like fun. As a game it will be kinda lame. The C64 controller is what, 70;s? 80's technology?

You'll put a ton of effort into it, and none of your friends will go 'WOW.'

But you'll still be the better for building it.


sorry dont remember what C64 stands for, but its like a playstatioc stick. they call it controller.
Posted on 2003-05-20 07:10:14 by dion
Hi, dion,

The project is simple to build.

While few people would be impressed with the end-result (assuming you are going to use it to play games), I think you would learn a lot about PIC microcontrollers by building it.
That is because once you build the board, you can do a lot of other things with it, not just play games.
The I/O's on the PIC aren't really committed, if you remove the resistors. So you will have a sort of development board that allows you to learn, test things for other projects and so on. (Imagine testing your coin counter and debouncer with this board).

I would build it. (I once built one with an 80C552, that did not have FLASH, but the code was loaded into external RAM and run from there.
I used for years, whenever I wanted to do something with an 8051, I would test the idea first).
Posted on 2003-05-20 11:56:50 by VVV
Nice project, quite impressive. I don't know why but I would not hook that up to my TV, my TV is just to preciouis :D
Posted on 2003-05-20 14:58:32 by x86asm
You gotta learn to walk before you run...

This is a small project as Ernie pointed out, but if you as into this idea as you say you are then you should definitely take it on. Mearly for the fact that one day you will finish it. And then go "how can i make this better".

Give it two years or so, and you might be surprised with the gamin systems your dreamin up then... (small steps ;) )

:alright:
NaN
Posted on 2003-05-20 21:42:27 by NaN
glad to see lessons and jokes :D . btw, C64, the C is Commodore. 64 bit maybe or something else?
Posted on 2003-05-21 08:11:42 by dion
LOL

No, not so sophisticated. The 64 is for 64K ram! It was an 8 bit computer with an addressable space of 2^16 = 64k. It was extremely popular and would have been a leader in todays computing market had the company exectives did their job properly. Its a funny thing how they went out of business. Everyone was still buying their newest computers at the time (mid 80's), just that the company itself was miss managed.... :rolleyes: (I adore my 64).
:NaN:
Posted on 2003-05-21 16:45:23 by NaN

LOL

No, not so sophisticated. The 64 is for 64K ram! It was an 8 bit computer with an addressable space of 2^16 = 64k. It was extremely popular and would have been a leader in todays computing market had the company exectives did their job properly. Its a funny thing how they went out of business. Everyone was still buying their newest computers at the time (mid 80's), just that the company itself was miss managed.... :rolleyes: (I adore my 64).

:NaN:


My Sega Genesis can beat a C64 anyday =P

I knoew it was for the ram, did the system use a 6502 or Z-80? I believe it was one of those.

BTW I looked at docs of the 6502, dont like it. =|
Posted on 2003-05-21 16:47:29 by x86asm
The C64 was just a marvel for its time. You have to understand that home computers then were extremely toy like, usually just a couple of K of RAM.

In walked the C64, fully loaded with the max of 64 K of RAM, an 8K ROM with a good BASIC on it, a 4 channel synthesiser, and a color video output for either a TV or a dedicated monitor they sold (not expensive either).

You have your choice or cassett or disk storage options too. I heard tell of a Z-80 add on if you wanted to run a CP/M machine, otherwise it was 6502 based (I never botherd doing asm on it).

Very good solid basic machine. I used one up till 1995 (when I traded it in for a pentium 100)
Posted on 2003-05-21 19:47:05 by Ernie
He he he I would just LOVE to start a 'my old home computer is better than your old home computer' war here....

I'm still using an Atari 800XL (mostly to play Strip Poker) but unfortunately due to the ravages of TIME, some of the keys don't work anymore, particularly Option which turns off the internal BASIC. And since most games needed the BASIC off (with the exception of a few like the aforementioned Strip Poker), I can't play most games on it anymore...

Had similar stats to your C64, too bad Atari was a dumb company at advertising. You could even connect it to a monitor Commodore sold (not expensive either) - well with some modification in the internals, since the 800XL did not give a separate Chroma signal (which is stupid because the circuitry to give it was there in the board itself, just needed to tap another line... why couldn't Atari do that).

Considering it's almost as old as I was, it's not a bad machine - it still runs, it still displays colored graphics (but the colors start to go off after some time being on, prolly need to fix something in the machine itself, or maybe it's just the TV I'm using...).

The 6502 machine language rocked! I remember building something like a cross-reference program so that I would have a list of labels in a source code file, it was a fun project. I even tried making it somewhat portable so that it could, in theory, be ported to Commodore and Apple machines and others based on 6502.
Posted on 2003-05-21 21:09:11 by AmkG
It's only significance at the time is it's embedded serial port which had awkward hardware and software configurations. It's an Intel oldie. The 80L188eb would do the same thing with a PC compatible configuration such as cascade interrupts 8259's, the 8253 TIC,and NS1640 compatible USART as well as DRAM controller etc. If you want to make it upward compatible I would go for 80386EX or 486EX. You have the same resources but can go 32 bit and slip into protected mode for larger that 1 MEG capability.
Posted on 2003-06-14 14:49:04 by mrgone