Has ANYONE ever seen commercial software written in Java, other than a web applet? Seriously...
Posted on 2003-06-13 16:29:49 by Paulicles the Philosopher
I'd rather buy commercial software written in Java than in Visual Basic. (shudder x 10)

;)
Posted on 2003-06-13 17:06:49 by iblis
I had one IRC friend that lived in Chicago, and worked on one whole system for money transfers or online shopping, in Java. He had been working on it for 1 year or more (he might be still working on it). I haven't seen him for 1 year, so I can't tell the result.
Personally, I do hate Java, and I do not see any good in it. Java is evil. Anyway, I know only one good piece of software, written in java, and it's an applet. http://www.webreference.com/3d/lesson112/
It is the only useful applet in all Net, for me. I'm not sure much about it being commercial, though. I guess it's as commercial as Flash - you need to pay only for the editor.
Posted on 2003-06-13 17:12:53 by Ultrano
As I had said in another thread "JAVA to me is the third circle of hell, stuck nicely between the oath breakers and the lawyers" so I guess if you could go there you would run into a few JAVA application programmers.
Posted on 2003-06-13 17:27:22 by donkey
I've seen several very large corporate frontends programmed in JAVA, and most the programmers where I work program in JAVA (one of the programmers just bought a new Corvet).
Posted on 2003-06-13 18:32:38 by bitRAKE
Another JAVA area is JSP(JAVA Service Pages), server-side JAVA. Not to say popular, PHP ,CGI and ASP are much more on the air, but it seems occupying a stable, developing market sector. You can recognize JSP-driven sites by .jsp extension. Flash nearly kicked out JAVA from applet sector (at least out of everything about animation, graphic entensive intros and small games with not too much complecated logic )
Posted on 2003-06-13 18:58:55 by Green Joe
i *write* commercial software in java :) as far as hll's go it is my favourite, (mostly because i am better at it then other hll), why do some of you hate it? or just hll generally?
Posted on 2003-06-13 19:41:01 by abc123
Java is to programming in the clouds, as
Assembly is to programming on the ground.

Java is choosen because no dependency on OS or hardware is desired.
Posted on 2003-06-13 20:04:49 by bitRAKE
I don't have all HLL's. I like C++ because it's simple (yes, I said it) and flexible.

For example, when I want to do file IO I can use:

1. MFC (it's a possibility, but I never do because it is bloated like VB)
2. Standard C++ library classes like iostream.
3. Standard C library file stream functions.
4. Low-level C I/O functions
5. Several Windows API functions in several different ways (sync, async, overlapped, etc.)

In Java, I would have to use those god-forsaken stream classes. I once was in a class on Java and it took me 30 minutes to find out which [...]Stream I had to use to write to a file in binary. In C++, you don't even need to use classes if you don't want to.

Java programmers always talk about how easy it is to make memory leaks in C++ apps. A good programmer, on the other hand, knows how to keep track of pointers.

I am talking quite a bit about C++. I am quite fond of ASM, but C++ is my favorite. I am not a big fan of that Microsoft .NET stuff, solely because the ICloneable.Close() method can either be implemented as a shallow copy or a deep copy, which is rightfully confusing.

If you want something that runs on every OS, then Java is a plus. But I would never appreciate needing to recompile my platform-independent apps every single time I run them (or every day I use them for that matter).

Yes, I know, this thread is more fit for the Crusades. I don't mind if it gets zapped there, for the sake of orderliness.

* If you have read this , you will know what I mean.
Posted on 2003-06-14 01:14:55 by Paulicles the Philosopher
In Java, I would have to use those god-forsaken stream classes. I once was in a class on Java and it took me 30 minutes to find out which [...]Stream I had to use to write to a file in binary. In C++, you don't even need to use classes if you don't want to.


yeah, I am no fan of the multitude of stream-object there are, but its simply enough just to use an "InputStream" to write out in binary...


But I would never appreciate needing to recompile my platform-independent apps every single time I run them (or every day I use them for that matter).


im not sure what you mean there, are you implying that you need to recompile a java app to run it on a different machine? or if you want to use it? ... thats not true at all; the whole point of java is that the .class files can be executed on any jvm of the same or higher version, without recompile of the .java source file.
Posted on 2003-06-14 02:39:45 by abc123
well, I like programming in java.
The platform independence had only once been shown useful to me (of course i'm sure it will proof again, but later). I had a linux box on which i played a nice snake game. When my friend came to me, he had only a windows box. I was glad when I recognised the snake game was written in java and we could play it over the net instantly.
Posted on 2003-06-14 03:34:44 by nyook
Jave MMORPG:

www.runescape.com
Posted on 2003-06-14 05:43:04 by ThoughtCriminal
Flash nearly kicked out JAVA from applet sector (at least out of everything about animation, graphic entensive intros and small games with not too much complecated logic )


Yes, but flhas is for that, think in this.. what append if you develop in java a good enviroment, with al that you want for only click a button and drag the circle, move, etc.. i think this can be done for java, but for write a demo, intro, etc, you need programm, not only click buttons and move, yes flash have its own language but is limited, with java you can have other things... maybe if java whant the "mercado" of intros and such things can be done in a specific way, and independent, only remember that jsp.. and if you can make an animation you get the all the language power. Also i remember that some intros or folow the mouse.. or some example like that.. stuck my CPU like 80%.

Also if i am not wrong EClipse is a complete IDE developed by a lot of "Companies" in java.

I am a little angry with some thing.. not with java.. but in the page of java :)
Posted on 2003-06-14 12:08:19 by rea
ibm ships their db2 database with java tools/frontends
Posted on 2003-06-14 12:11:51 by nyook
When I said "compile" I used the term incorrectly. What I meant to say is that the Java virtual machine has to read the bytecode and turn it into whatever form it uses to run it. Also, jar files have to be de(j)archived, and so on.
Posted on 2003-06-14 15:55:50 by Paulicles the Philosopher
a yes, some friend send me a link with a page in flash, here you can see what i am saying when i say it load the cpu at 100% woaoooo....!!! http://www.ingeniun.com/

Like you and me know one tool for the specific work..

Nice day.
Posted on 2003-06-16 16:49:20 by rea
nice to see, that Java is still alive, I thought it's already dead :) I dealed with it some years ago
(since '97) and could not find any advantage - it was terribly slow, did crash often and had the
same sytanx like C, nothing new, nothing better.

Since MS does not support Java for the "mainstream" people, it will likely pass away...
Posted on 2003-06-17 02:41:27 by beaster
AFAIK whole Oracle front end is Java written. This is the reason I stop like Oracle after few months of working with. :grin:
Posted on 2003-06-17 05:21:42 by JohnFound
Hi

I remember a Office-Suite from Corel written in Java. Don't remember
applet, servlet or shitlet. :) It was in the middle of the nineties.

Bye Miracle
Posted on 2003-06-20 05:06:56 by miracle
what about the many uses of java to do non-pc related stuff, like in cellphones and other appliances? thats what my teacher has been saying and i think he has a point

also if there seems to be plenty of work available for java programmers, if u look around on sites like monster
Posted on 2003-06-27 14:56:58 by AnotherWay83