I'm super new to ASM, and I'm also interested in the new XGS system (runs on 68HCS12 and 6502) and I was wondering if you guys knew any resources for it.

once I get an hour of free time I'll be reading Iczelion's tuts. 1 week into school and already I'm without free time. :(
Posted on 2003-08-23 20:30:19 by Ninkazu
I thought that it used some version of 68000 assem.

If it is 6502, some people here know how to use it.

Welcome to the board. Programming questions not about x86 assem and/or Windows programing, usually belong in the heap section of the board. It'll save the mods from having to move them.

The XGS has a website with forums (Sorry dont know the URL)
Posted on 2003-08-24 01:31:30 by ThoughtCriminal
I belong to those forums, but no one there really knows much about it either. ASM is this place's specialty, so... I just thought you could help.
Posted on 2003-08-24 10:46:05 by Ninkazu

I belong to those forums, but no one there really knows much about it either. ASM is this place's specialty, so... I just thought you could help.


We can help, thought I know next to nothing about the 6502. I remember someone did mention the 6502 here but I forgot his name, he really knew this processor quite well.
Posted on 2003-08-24 10:48:50 by x86asm
I guess I'm not the only one, but I wrote 6502 programs almost 20 years ago (mostly C64 games).

If you need tutorials on 6502, I recommend the excellent site:

http://www.6502.org/

or:

http://www.ffd2.com/fridge/

and a site full of links (more C64 related):

http://www.c64.cc/

6502 was the processor of several very old computers, like Apple 2, Atari 800, Commodore 64, and some less known like Oric/Atmos, and some consoles like VCS Atari (with 4Kb ROM, and 128 bytes RAM !).
Programming this is reserved to the nostalgic, but you can also check EHBasic which is still in development. There is also a good C compiler: http://www.cc65.org, which is heavily used for cross-development.

If you really want to learn 6502, well, there is no better way than running an emulator and looking what happens.
20 years ago, I managed to understand 6502 assembly without any documentation nor help, so I guess it's even more easy nowadays.

JC
Posted on 2003-08-24 11:48:32 by MCoder
I know all about it!
I'm making a NES game at the moment. :alright:
Posted on 2003-08-24 15:12:19 by Sephiroth3
Ok seph, do you have any good resources other than those listed? 68HCS12 ASM would be nice too :P
Posted on 2003-08-24 16:46:59 by Ninkazu
I did a lot of 6502 around 15 years ago and should be able to answer any *specific* questions you ask. I didn't realise that processor was still being used these days....
Posted on 2003-08-25 08:27:07 by sluggy
I know 6502 too.... Did Atari 8-bit programming...

The real cute thing about the 6502 was that you had tons of addressing modes to choose from... Sure you had only 3 registers, but hey, with those three, you could access a lot of memory pretty easy.
Posted on 2003-08-26 04:57:58 by AmkG
Here's an idea for a poll. List the 8-bit assembly languages and ask which one you know and/or used. I suspect most of this board's members know z80, 6502, and 6809 :) . 6502 assembly is the first one I learned.

Charles
Posted on 2003-08-26 13:44:41 by cdquarles

I know 6502 too.... Did Atari 8-bit programming...

The real cute thing about the 6502 was that you had tons of addressing modes to choose from... Sure you had only 3 registers, but hey, with those three, you could access a lot of memory pretty easy.


Yeah, and those illegal (= undocumented) opcodes :)

I learned 6502 assembly on C=64, btw.
Posted on 2003-08-26 18:45:15 by Morris
6502 Apple //c.

Them were the days, it was easy to remember the opcodes and program in HEX without an assembly. Apple had a built-in utility in ROM called the Monitor and Mini-Assembler...


Thanks,
_Shawn
Posted on 2003-08-26 21:43:57 by _Shawn
You C= and Apple guys were lucky. Atari doesn't have a monitor built-in (it had BASIC built in... and Atari BASIC did syntax checking at program entry time, so you couldn't use the BASIC editor to edit a .SRC program). Me, I once had not only to hand-assemble the code, but actually code the hex into a string.... all those tapping of weird control codes...
Posted on 2003-08-29 07:47:20 by AmkG
I used the MAE 6502 assembler on an Atari-800XL. I've still got a bunch of source code on diskette. I also found a nice Atari emulator, but I still haven't found anything that can read the old diskettes on a PC... :(
Posted on 2003-08-29 09:14:10 by S/390
Sephiroth3,

How are you able to know the information about making a NES game... I tried looking for info but the only thing I can find is the source code to Metroid (my favorite game, BTW).



Thanks,
_Shawn
Posted on 2003-09-04 11:16:10 by _Shawn
Well, there are a lot of documents on the NES on the internet. Try nesdev.parodius.com or www.zophar.net. They won't teach you how to make a game, but it should get you started.
Posted on 2003-09-04 18:44:32 by Sephiroth3
I like 6502 in my opinion this was The Easiest processor in the Old World!
Z80 has 4Mhz and compare with 6502 1Mhz was long behind the 6502.
I know how to program both of them but prefere 6502.


This time to build own electr. project I recommend 80c51 famiy because there in needn't memory refreshing(StaticRAM) and separate chip to use ports like rs232 or lpt to transfer binary data.Another adwantage is the internal flash-RAM (like bios) you may to programm.

I have done some links for old C64/128 to transfer programs from internet through the PC to Commodore's parallel. If you want to know and want to use c64 for IRC conection just ask.
Posted on 2003-09-11 08:38:13 by etn

You C= and Apple guys were lucky. Atari doesn't have a monitor built-in (it had BASIC built in... and Atari BASIC did syntax checking at program entry time, so you couldn't use the BASIC editor to edit a .SRC program). Me, I once had not only to hand-assemble the code, but actually code the hex into a string.... all those tapping of weird control codes...




You Atari and Apple guys were lucky. C=64 does not have any graphics or soun function in basic ... ;)

and asm monitor was only in cartridges or tape/drive programms not in ROM kernel (which name is Kernal in C64)
Posted on 2003-09-11 09:02:23 by etn
Hi etn!

Yes lol; but that 1MHz 6502/65c02 ran as fast as that 4MHz Z80:grin::) ((IIRC it did memory accesses on the rising edge and the falling edge of the clock pulse). I had an Apple IIe that I added a 3MHz 65sc816 and 1MB ram to; and it was as fast as an 8MHz IBM AT clone. Unfortunately, an Apple IIgs board swap didn't work:( .

Charles

PS I picked up an emulator for the 6502 on the internet today because someone posted a request to do a 6502 emulation on a MIPS emulator called SPIM. I'm not going to tackle that project, but I'd like a 65SC816 emulator for x86.
Posted on 2003-10-15 14:37:03 by cdquarles