Yeasterday the Swedish foreignminister Anna Lindh was attacked by an man armed with a knive, to day at 05.29 she died from her injuries (after several hours of operations).
I've heard that she was stabbed primarily in the abdomen. The attack occured while she was in a store in Stockholm (on a private errand), she is said to just have gotten up to the 2nd floor when she was assulted, she didn't have any lifguard since the security agency (S?PO) had made the judgment that she at the moment wasn't in any need of protection. The attacker is still at large, and unkown (thought the police have a description of the attacker).
It's a sad event, and we are about to have an election as wether we're going to enter the final step of the monetary union (changing to the euro currentcy), she was involved in the election. The motive is at the moment of writing unknown, there are specualtions about it, but no one knows any connection to teh elevtion is at the moment only specualtions.
Posted on 2003-09-11 04:22:28 by scientica
I heard what happend there in sweden
:mad:
I mean there is no excuse for this but i am living here in austria and since the ? Euro came everything became more expensiv (even if they said before it wont)
cause i heard she is somehow involved with this eurothing in sweden next weekend.
from milk to bread, from the subways to banking everything became more expensiv. Even the stupid coffeemashine became 50 cent a coffee, everyone raised their prices.
The Euro is expensiv, very expensiv.
Maybe thats why your foreingminister had to die...
Posted on 2003-09-11 13:26:19 by Ranma_at
Meh,

It's sad when anybody is killed. I just can't see attaching any special significance to a murder because it is a public official. It makes for nothing more than good TV spots as the other politicians cry crocodile tears while they plot for ways to take over her job and usurp the power that she leaves behind. Whatever reason she was killed is it more or less important than the guy who is stabbed for spare change in a mugging ? There are deaths, and many are murders, if she was a good person then the world is a litte lesser for it but am I outraged about it ? I am no more or less outraged than when I hear about any murder no matter the reason. I am outraged when I hear about crimes against children or animals, they are defenseless and deserve special consideration. I hope they catch the guy, but as for the woman I did not know her so I find it difficult to really feel anything about it at all.
Posted on 2003-09-11 13:49:12 by donkey
Im quite young, and im not one to say what should be what ,but over in America things dont happen like that here quite often(not to important people for that matter). All the countries should get together and create rules and regulations that pertain to matters as such to all countries. Then i think we wouldn't have things like this occuring so often, then again i could be wrong. I know im gonna be corrected so lets hear it:tongue:

but sad news though:(
Posted on 2003-09-11 14:32:43 by Guy on ASM
Hi Guy on Asm

Thanks but the US can keep it's system, I would rather not live in the police state that it has become recently. I like the fact that my Prime Minister can walk home from parlaiment and I like the fact that my every move is not monitored by my government whatever reason they make up for it.
Posted on 2003-09-11 14:52:27 by donkey

I just can't see attaching any special significance to a murder because it is a public official.

Hello? Who represent the country, the departments, the people? How often do you see "average" ppl from different countries rather than their leaders/ministers/"public officials" on the news when some big political descision is discussed?
As an minister you are (often) set responsible for the entire deparments work (esp. if no one lower in the hiracy is hung out and eaten alive by media), the minister is the face of that deparment, some people forget that it's not just the minister that works there - they simply blaim the minster. Ofcourse some ministers can do bad things too, they're humans too, but so many times they're held responsible for other poeples errors/actions (and the medias seems to be endlessly searching for a scapegoat/some one to hang high).
Every murder of innocent people, every poinless murder is bad/terrible, but a murder of a public official is worse (since it can be a symbolic act). would you be equally in-understading if some one killed some minister in you govermet? Would you say "ok, yet another person is dead, how sad, but he's just another man, wonder what politican has ploted to take his place" as if he were any ordinary human?
(btw, no all politicans are evil monsters that longer for power, filthy amounts of money and dictator ship... (at least no wher I'm at :| ))

Here in Sweden, things aren't quite as in let's say America, we have a more open socity, a lesser violent (for instance, we don't have people killing their former workmates because they got fired, at least not in the extent as in the USA (eventhough it's not every day actions (,right?), but it has occured, from my point of view, far too often, perhaps it's the easy access to weapons? ) ).
As for globalization, not everyone likes it, there are many extremists that strongly objects to this (the are few, but "noisy") -- especially when speaking of a greater cooperation/integration between countries police or military on a larger scale than border regions helping each other, many people are kinda scared of a creation of a superstate (which IMO is going to be created at somepoint in the future, for good or worse?: no idea... ))

This murder is by many seen as an attack on the Swedish open socity, democracy. Many fear that this will lead to a more closed socity, where politicans are taken further and further away from people, making them more inaccessible (separated from the "commoners"), making it harder for people to comunicate with them. To many this is more than "just" the murder of a minister, a wife and mother.
Posted on 2003-09-11 15:00:08 by scientica
I have much respect for anyone who dedicates their life to the service of a countries people. The kind of attacker that would slice open the adomen of their pray has death as their goal - I have heard it is a very painful death as well. It would be interesting to know what strategic role she had, and who would profit from her death?
Posted on 2003-09-11 15:06:24 by bitRAKE
Sorry Scientica,

Nice speech but I can't see your point of view. She was a person, that's all. You are attaching special circumstances because of her job, I don't. If my foreign minister was murdered I would react the same way I do now (though for the life of me I have no idea who it is). Actually the vast majority of Canadians cannot name the minister of forein affairs as ministers are not considered that important here. The politicians do not represent my view to the world, they represent the view of the amount of people they managed to convince that they were not lying when they made their promises at election time. My point of view is my point of view and if they share it well, all the better but I don't expect them to. They are functionaries whose task is to keep the commonly shared components of society running and nothing more. I feel just as bad if I hear about a "common" man being killed by a mugger, he probably had a job as well, if he didn't then the politicians aren't doing their jobs. And just as a side note, as a minister she probably had little or no control over the view she presented to the world, she would have been little more than a mouthpeice for the ruling party and her department. There is nothing significant here to me that makes it more or less important than any other murder except that she has two children, it is sad that they are without a mother today, that is important.
Posted on 2003-09-11 15:13:42 by donkey
Rumours in certain circles has it that it's the work of neo-nazi's - they seem ot be pretty active recently; not too many days ago, police found massive amounts of explosives in a nazi camp.

I'm pretty happy the danish nazis are run by a clueless fool - they don't do more damage than a few silly parades and a bit of yelling.
Posted on 2003-09-11 15:27:53 by f0dder
Ok, I tried, but we all have our point of view...


Actually the vast majority of Canadians cannot name the minister of forein affairs as ministers are not considered that important here.

Ok, in Sweden the foreign minister is seen as one of the persons that are representing Sweden in foreign countries. (Ofcouse other minsiters are also seen as representatives of Sweden, but the forignminister is seens one of the most known faces of Sweden).
It appears as we still (it has been failing) have a greater respect to our ministers/politicans than in other countries, is my interprentation correct?

There is nothing significant here to me that makes it more or less important than any other murder except that she has two children, it is sad that they are without a mother today, that is important.

The greatest sorrow is in her family, everyone agrees on that (media too).
Posted on 2003-09-11 15:28:44 by scientica

Ok, I tried, but we all have our point of view...


Ok, in Sweden the foreign minister is seen as one of the persons that are representing Sweden in foreign countries. (Ofcouse other minsiters are also seen as representatives of Sweden, but the forignminister is seens one of the most known faces of Sweden).
It appears as we still (it has been failing) have a greater respect to our ministers/politicans than in other countries, is my interprentation correct?

The minister of finance is considered the only really important ministerial job here, the rest are training positions for that one. The minister of finance is generally considered as the post given to the best candidate for the next Prime Minister.

I have a respect for people who dedicate their lives to public service, but usually the ones who make it to the privy council are people who have dedicated their lives to the pursuit of power, there is a fundamental difference there. A politician who is successful is not necessarily a dedicated public servant and does not automatically get my respect. For example, I respect our Prime Minister alot even though I don't agree with his policies on most things, he is a public servant, he has dedicated his life to doing what he thought was right even if it hurt him politically. That I can respect, a shill for the department of foreign affairs is just another person doing a job to me.

Both of our countries are dedicated to the principles of equality, there can be no-one that is more equal than others or that system is a lie.
Posted on 2003-09-11 15:48:05 by donkey
you have to understand that in Europe where countries sometimes have up to 5 neighbouring countries as well as the position towards the European Union coupled with important and often economically necessary intra-country trade interests, the position of minister of foreign affairs is a very important one. (usually keeper of peace)

Moreover she was a women. This in particular is what I find to be the hardest blow. Women still need good role-models in politics IMO, so that they can be convinced to pick up the *job* and transform it to the next level by bringing in feminin elements in what has been so far by origin a male dominated and defined field. It's a shame to have to lose such a prime example. :(
Posted on 2003-09-11 17:04:40 by Hiroshimator
It could be that because in Canada we have had women in the upper echelons of goverment for such a long time that I failed to see that. Our Governor General is a woman and seriously people tend not even to think about it much here. Having a woman in a position of power is nothing out of the ordinary in Canada and though it is true that they are under-represented, there has not been the Gentleman's Club attitude here for quite some time.
Posted on 2003-09-11 17:21:26 by donkey
well understand that for several european countries women couldn't vote say 60 years ago.

Unfortunately there still is too much a male dominance in politics, coupled with useless male machismo like stress, all-nighter meetings and meetings at impossible hours or over impossible periods.


for example in my country the first time women got the right to vote was in 1948 (yes, it was th?t backwards)
Posted on 2003-09-11 17:30:12 by Hiroshimator
this link gives a nice idea how long it took for countries to adapt voting rights for women http://www.ipu.org/wmn-f/suffrage.htm

my country has a shameful place :(
Posted on 2003-09-11 17:34:41 by Hiroshimator
Well, women have had the right to vote here since 1917 and as early as the 1920's there were already woman judges and members of parlaiment but in the 1970's under Pierre Trudeau they truly moved into positions of power (the privy council - where the true power resides in this country). We have now had Speakers of the House, MP's, Governor Generals almost every ministry and a Prime Minister of the female persuation. I just don't notice it much any more, just some-one filling a job.

The thing is that the dates don't matter as much as the attitude, just giving them the power to do something is not the same as making that acceptable in society.
Posted on 2003-09-11 18:09:52 by donkey
the problem here is role-models/examples I think. We even have laws dictating that a certain percentage of voting lists *must* be of the other sex.

still doesn't help so it's an image problem mostly.
Posted on 2003-09-11 18:32:24 by Hiroshimator
My sympathy for Sweedish people,

This reminds me when six months ago Serbian prime minister were shoot dead by sniper. It is also interesting that Anna Lindh was on that day (march 12th) here in Belgrade and was about to meet with prime minister but unfortunatelly that meeting was never held. Who would say that the same thing will happen to her...
Posted on 2003-09-11 19:30:24 by Mikky

Unfortunately there still is too much a male dominance in politics, coupled with useless male machismo like stress, all-nighter meetings and meetings at impossible hours or over impossible periods.

I 2nd that, but the only thing I can do (beeing a male), is to support females that try to enter the political arena.
From what I've heard she always put a very high value on the family (yet "saving" them from the medias), trying ot get home on time, and kept the contact with them via (cell)phone when beeing out working. She tried to live a normal life, like any other mother..

Mikky, I rememver that (not the specific day, but the event - the cowardness of it), it was little reminder how easy somevodys life can be taken. I felt sorrow for the people in that region, and hoped that the peace and unification would continue to grow.
Posted on 2003-09-11 23:50:39 by scientica
This is bad that a woman was killed.
Unfortunally, there a lot of similar deths arround us, many people are leaving this world...
That's life.

But politics is politics - there are always some more chances to be killed.
This is the desteny politicans have chosen.
Sometimes they are servants of peoples, sometimes they are masters,
sometimes they're making peace, sometimes - war.
One man can kill a million - just for... some odd reasons.
No wonder why... one time one other sick man gets the knife in hands. To kill... or to stay alive.
That's life.

No offence to anyone, it's just my point of view why things are going such way.

P.S.
The life and the death - they are allways together, like 0 and 1.
But the more spite in the world - the more death.
Kill me if I'm wrong.
:(
Posted on 2003-09-12 04:12:28 by S.T.A.S.