HI Randall Hyde,

I saw you on TechTV this afternoon! Nice eyeglasses! They are so 80s:cool:
I wish you plugged the board:) Anyways, nice to see you live:grin:

regards,
flotsam
Posted on 2003-09-13 02:33:32 by flotsam
I had to sleep, so missed it. But I'll try recording it on Monday. Any idea if Screensavers will be on before then?

http://www.techtv.com/screensavers/shownotes/story/0,24330,3512239,00.html
Posted on 2003-09-13 18:17:17 by Masmer
FYI: Here's a clip from the Screensavers daily newsletter.

"Programming is an art, and author Randall Hyde will be on the show to prove it. Hyde's book "Write Great Code" is a key addition to every programmer's personal library. Hyde will be discussing the art of coding assembly language, which allows you to talk directly to your hardware like some kind of robotic Dr. Doolittle. Nifty."
Posted on 2003-09-14 16:30:59 by Masmer
i think they have reruns every saturday. check it out:alright:
anyways, leo laporte had no idea wtf randall was talking about:grin:
Posted on 2003-09-14 20:33:32 by flotsam
sometimes those tech-tv shows are nice and informative but they could use a bit of more 'in the field' people presenting it :/

anyone know if you can download the interview?
Posted on 2003-09-15 02:56:29 by Hiroshimator
I'm taping it now. Mr. Hyde is supposedly coming on after the break.

I could have converted it to a mpg, but my system died. If no one else does, when I buy a new motherboard\processor in another two months, I'll make it available.
Posted on 2003-09-15 07:13:59 by Masmer
Comments on the interview:

The show was done live (really Live, not "recorded live") and I had
very little in the way of preparation for the interview :-)

Why not plug the board?
I barely got to plug the publisher of AoA (that was something I
had to sneak in...). I didn't even get a plug for Webster in there :-)
Trust me, my brain was racing to keep up with the interview
and keep things moving along. Fortunately, Leo's a pretty good
interviewer and kept things moving along really well.

Those 80's glasses!
Yep, I'm a 70's/80's kinda guy.
Too bad you didn't get to see my "biker boots" :-)
Shoulda worn "cords", though.

Reruns:
The show was aired live (which I find unbelievable).
They'll re-run it several times (e.g., Monday Sept 15, it
ran two additional times). Often they put up video clips
on their website. Show information is available here:
http://www.techtv.com/screensavers/shownotes/story/0,24330,3512239,00.html

Currently the show is not scheduled for a re-run, but if you'd
like to see it, feel free to email them at
http://www.asmcommunity.net/board/cryptmail.php?tauntspiders=in.your.face@nomail.for.you&id=8243b22dba869e5aff24e44e185aba49
Someone told me that they often put portions of shows up
in a Quicktime (or other multimedia) format, so you might
ask about this as well. At some point in the future, I'll try
to get permission to post a Quicktime movie of the interview
if TechTV isn't going to do this.
In any case, an email to the show would be something I'd
recommend. It would also help encourage them to do future
shows on assembly language programming (maybe they
can bring in some other assembler authors...)


About the interview:
I was actually expecting the whole interview to be more of
a ridicule thing ("What? You actually promote assembly?")
but Leo has actually been around the block a few times and
has either worked in assembly in the past or has been really
well coached on the subject. In any case, the interview came
off much better than I was expecting.

Obviously, given the audience "The Screen Savers" reaches,
we couldn't get too technical. But I think that anything that
puts assembly back in the eyes of the general public is going
to be a good thing.

There were a couple of comments made by Leo that I had
to bite my tongue on. For example, I wish I'd seen a copy
of the script he read from the teleprompter during the
introduction -- I never was a "professor" and I'm not currently
teaching at UCR (though no one who isn't at UCR would
really care about that; I'm sure I'll here about this from
someone at UCR, though). I almost laughed when I ran
my little "Ellipses" demo from "Windows Programming
in Assembly" and Leo said "You won't find code like that
written in a high-level language." Considering that "Ellipses"
was a modification of the "Rectangles" program appearing
in Petzold's "Windows Programming" book, it's pretty obvious
you *can* find code like that written in a HLL.
Overall, the rest of the interview went fairly well considering
it was totally unrehearsed and "off-the-cuff" for me.

About the only thing I've ever watched on TechTV has
been Japanese animation, so I'm completely out of touch
with the audience for shows like "The Screen Savers."
Apparently, they have a good sized audience. I went on
the show at about 4:10p (Pacific Daylight Time), we left
immediately after my segment and we were back at the
publisher's office by 4:45. There were already three orders
for my book on the publisher's web site that arrived as a
result of the interview. When I got home on Sunday, there
were a pile of emails waiting for me as a result of the show.
I'd pretty much written the weekend off as an excuse to
go to San Francisco; I wasn't sure if the interview would have
any impact, I guess I was wrong.

Perhaps the most interesting part about the interview
was when I was talking with the marketing person at
No Starch Press after the interview and I asked her
what strings they pulled to get me on the show (the
publisher personally knows the hosts of the show and
the publisher's offices are about a mile from the studio).
As it turns out, there were no strings pulled. The publicist
sent out press releases for "The Art of Assembly Language"
to everyone and anyone, TechTV included, and the show's
producers jumped on the opportunity to get someone in
to talk about this "Hacker's Language".
To me, that's a very good sign. The fact that "average"
people are showing an interest in assembly language
is a very positive development.
Cheers,
Randy Hyde

P.S. Oh yes, I almost forgot. The whole purpose of
the interview is because "The Art of Assembly
Language" is now *real*. Yes, I actually got to *touch*
a real copy of the book (even got to bring home a case
of them with me from the publisher). It'll be a few days
before outfits like Amazon and Borders get their copies
in and clean up their web pages. In the meantime, the
publisher is offering a pretty good deal on the book
for anyone who wants a copy:
http://www.nostarch.com
Posted on 2003-09-16 11:14:56 by rhyde
Good job Randall! I couldn't have done anywhere as well on a live TV show. Hopefully a wave of new people are swayed to the Asm side after seeing the show. I was able to watch it twice on Monday, taped it and watched it a handful of times off the tape. Now my father has a clue as to what all my fuss about assembly programming is about ... thanks! :grin: I was thinking of typing up a transcript of the segment and posting it here instead of making a video available as I also realized I needed Tech TV's permission. (Would I need permission to post a transcript?)

Showing that the HLA "compiler" outputs standard asm files was insightful. Leo said he used to program using assembly for the 68000 (but he did say he read your AoA). Mentioning viruses are created in asm might get some bad apples involved in asm. :( Argh! Why did Leo say that you can get any geekier that programming using assembly?! :tongue:

I have already put the book in my cart at No Starch and have told a bunch of my online friends that it's finally out. I plan on trying HLA again (when I have a PC again) to determine whether to focus on it instead of Masm. If so, I'll get the book when I have the cash. Meanwhile, I started plowing my way though the Masm Bible again last week, despite it targeting DOS.

PS: Congratulations on finally getting the work completed to get AoA published! I hope it sells very well.
Posted on 2003-09-16 12:33:38 by Masmer
Originally posted by Masmer
(Would I need permission to post a transcript?)

Probably not. "Fair use" and all.
I'm sure that if you posted a video clip that would be problematic.
Of course, if you want to be careful you might try emailing the show and request permission to post a transcript. I can't imagine that they would deny such a request (it promotes their show, after all).


Showing that the HLA "compiler" outputs standard asm files was insightful. Leo said he used to program using assembly for the 68000 (but he did say he read your AoA).


Actually, Leo wanted an example of any "standard" assembly code. Given that I had to produce something right on the spot (remember, I had no idea what he was going to ask for, this was *live*) I just brought up the MASM output from the HLA compiler for the "Hello World" program. I almost had a heart attack on that one ("omygod! I don't have any MASM source files installed on their computer...!") Fortunately, I recovered well on that one. Glad it looked like that's what I intended to throw up there :-).



Mentioning viruses are created in asm might get some bad apples involved in asm. :( Argh! Why did Leo say that you can get any geekier that programming using assembly?! :tongue:

That was one of those "off-the-cuff" remarks that I'm not real happy with (neither was Leo, I could tell by the look on his face). But it was the only thing that came to mind as we were talking about "hackers" at the time.

"Geek" is an honorary title on that show, as best I can tell (much like some people think being called a "hacker" is a good thing, I suppose). They were certainly throwing this term around in a positive like during the pre-show period. Personally, I'm old enough to remember when all these terms were "not a good thing" so I don't like to apply them to people I respect, but they speak a more "hip" language (even if it's only amongst nerds) on the show, so I'm not going to complain too much.


I have already put the book in my cart at No Starch and have told a bunch of my online friends that it's finally out. I plan on trying HLA again (when I have a PC again) to determine whether to focus on it instead of Masm. If so, I'll get the book when I have the cash. Meanwhile, I started plowing my way though the Masm Bible again last week, despite it targeting DOS.

Every bit helps!


PS: Congratulations on finally getting the work completed to get AoA published! I hope it sells very well.

My hope is that it does well enough that the publisher will be interested in putting out additional assembly language titles (mine or someone else's). While it's great to have AoA finally in a published form (particularly for schools), the thing that's really going to cement the "assembly revival" is a new crop of advanced assembly books. I'm hoping that AoA does well enough that we'll see publishers willing to take a risk on the next wave of assembly books.

In the meantime, I've got to get back to work on "Write Great Code" which many people are looking forward to (people love the title; I'm surprised how many people announce "Art of Assembly" by claiming "it's writing by the author of 'Write Great Code'..." Considering WGC has one more proof-reading pass in my hands before it heads off to the publisher, I'm amazed at the hype it's getting; definitely tells me that we've picked a great title for it :-)).
Cheers,
Randy Hyde
Posted on 2003-09-16 13:16:20 by rhyde

Good job Randall! I couldn't have done anywhere as well on a live TV show. Hopefully a wave of new people are swayed to the Asm side after seeing the show. I was able to watch it twice on Monday, taped it and watched it a handful of times off the tape. Now my father has a clue as to what all my fuss about assembly programming is about ... thanks! :grin: I was thinking of typing up a transcript of the segment and posting it here instead of making a video available as I also realized I needed Tech TV's permission. (Would I need permission to post a transcript?)



Please , post the transcript and some screenshot ! I'm dying for this :grin:
Posted on 2003-09-17 21:21:42 by dreamweaver
Posted on 2003-09-18 00:26:12 by rhyde
I'm not very happy with the virus remark either since it's exactly the image we want t combat :/

these days I think there are more virus written in c++ or delphi than asm :|
Posted on 2003-09-19 04:46:42 by Hiroshimator

these days I think there are more virus written in c++ or delphi than asm :|

What cruel world we live in :( :( :( , let's change things and show them lame script kiddies how things are done... :P ;)

Seriously, it wouldn't surprise me if the next warhol virus is created .net aganst M$... It would be so typical, you have the right to make backups, anything you code can and will be used against you.
Posted on 2003-09-19 08:29:17 by scientica
The link takes me to an add bitrate selection, then an add, that takes me to amazon.com...


Wheres the video???




nm. I fiddled with my security settings.


You look younger that I expected.
Posted on 2003-09-19 11:19:39 by ThoughtCriminal
I used mmsclient to download it (the asf stream), it's a linux thing but it exists for windows as well. I'm not at home right now but if you haven't found the windows client by the time I get back I'll paste it's url here :)
Posted on 2003-09-19 11:38:48 by Hiroshimator
http://users.pandora.be/vandewoestyne/html/open_source_windows.html

here you can find a link to a windows version of mmsclient :)
Posted on 2003-09-19 13:41:40 by Hiroshimator
All Right! :alright:
I spent a lot of time looking for a tool that could (successfully) do it.
I now have the interview downloaded.
Thanks!+++
Posted on 2003-09-19 16:21:19 by Masmer
Randy Hyde,

You look a lot different than I have been picturing you all these years. I always pictured you with (the same glasses), unstyled/maintained 70's hair, dark long beard, and razor claws. But now that I've seen you, I'd've never guessed.

I didn't see that virus remark too out of place, it's the truth. I saw the host didn't go anywhere with it (he's quick). But most viruses these days (that get the media) aren't assembly-based, but rather VB Script based. So the next time someone asks me what VB Script is used for these days, perhaps I can say "Melissa, Slammer, but not Michealangelo"...


Thanks,
Shawn
Posted on 2003-09-19 22:33:29 by _Shawn
so do I . I picture Mr.Hyde as a thin old man with white hair , metal face like Arsene Wenger ( no glass ) or Alex Ferguson (glass ).
Posted on 2003-09-20 02:14:45 by dreamweaver
Here's one of Randall I've seen before:

Posted on 2003-09-20 05:32:55 by Masmer