BASIC (Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) celebrates its 40th birthday.
It was originally developed by two math professors, John Kemeny en Thomas Kurtz, aan het Darthmouth College in New Hampshire, in 1963.
A year later (1964), it was presented to the world.
In retrospect, this moment is considered as the dawn of the personal computing age.

In the 80s, people started buying computers for home-use. These home computers were often fitted with a BASIC interpreter in ROM. This caused a boost in the popularity of BASIC. BASIC was easy to use for beginning programmers.
As the computers became more powerful, more advanced languages were used, and BASIC disappeared.

In 2004, there are still many languages that have their roots in BASIC. Microsoft Visual BASIC is perhaps the most popular example.
Posted on 2004-04-30 12:05:07 by Scali
10 CLS
20 PRINT "Happy Birthday!"
30 GOTO 10

Ah, good ol' qbasic.. Really enjoyed the Snake game it had.
Posted on 2004-04-30 12:46:09 by JimmyClif
if i remember the snake game used the standard texmode 03h (25 lines or so), and split each character into 2 to virtually double the vertical resolution... with the ascii chars that represented a black char, a white char, a half-back/half-white or half-white/half black char... not easy to explain...

are you talking of MS qbasic that came with dos?
Posted on 2004-04-30 13:20:36 by HeLLoWorld
Originally posted by HeLLoWorld
are you talking of MS qbasic that came with dos?


No, I don't think so because QBasic is only one of the dialects of BASIC.

Marwin
Posted on 2004-04-30 14:04:23 by Marwin
Actually I was talking about QBasic. Even though that I barely programmed on it I did copy it from old disks onto newer generations of windows where it wasn't included anymore.

The Snake game was a marvelous time-killer :)
Posted on 2004-04-30 14:21:11 by JimmyClif
LOCATE in BASIC made me interested in computers and everything that folllowed is history.

:grin:
Posted on 2004-04-30 14:54:59 by arkane
Many BASICs were so similar in the 80's that going from one to another was very easy.
Posted on 2004-04-30 14:59:03 by bitRAKE
Lets not forget Gorillas on QBasic :)
Posted on 2004-04-30 15:51:23 by Eóin
LOL I remeber when I as 8 or 9 and using a 386SX PC, I remember asking my dad if I could make an OS and in I tried to program one in BASIC (of all languages LOL) and it was a good endeavour but I never actually realized it :p

BASIC was the first language I learned, it helped me on the way to learn the more complicated C/C++ and ASM for various CPU's, I would still recommend it for beginners
Posted on 2004-04-30 17:30:35 by x86asm

Lets not forget Gorillas on QBasic :)


I still have gorilla.bas :)
Posted on 2004-04-30 17:45:34 by SpooK
I wouldn't recommend BASIC for beginners, rather Pascal or Java. Why? http://catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/B/BASIC.html ^_^
Posted on 2004-04-30 18:11:11 by f0dder

I wouldn't recommend BASIC for beginners, rather Pascal or Java. Why? http://catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/B/BASIC.html ^_^



That makes me rethink what I just said :D
Posted on 2004-04-30 21:17:09 by x86asm
Afternoon, Rickey.


Many BASICs were so similar in the 80's that going from one to another was very easy.


That's because Microsoft is the company which programmed the BASIC for those computers.

Cheers,
Scronty
Posted on 2004-04-30 21:32:31 by Scronty
Scronty, all of them (TRS-80, TRS-1000, Apple, Atari, etc...) !? Wow, I wasn't aware of that.
Posted on 2004-04-30 22:34:29 by bitRAKE
Yeah, Apple originally paid $21,000 to Microsoft for an 8 year license for BASIC. About the only computers that did not use Microsoft Basic were Commodore and TI, they made their own versions. I think that MSBasic was just a rip-off of RSTS/E Basic on the PDP-11 anyway, read that somewhere once.
Posted on 2004-04-30 23:04:09 by donkey
Afternoon, Donkey.


About the only computers that did not use Microsoft Basic were Commodore and TI, they made their own versions.


http://www.computerhope.com/history/198090.htm

1982
The Commodore 64 begins to be sold with 64 kilobytes of random-access memory and containing Microsoft BASIC and dropping in price from 0 to 0 allows it to become the best-selling computer of all time.


C64 as well :tongue: .

Cheers,
Scronty
Posted on 2004-04-30 23:26:35 by Scronty
Yes, and AmigaBasic was also written by Microsoft.
I am not sure though, but I think the early Apples had their own BASIC, rather than Microsoft's. I believe I read somewhere that Steve Wozniak wrote the original Apple BASICs.
Posted on 2004-05-01 03:40:07 by Scali
:grin:
I learned BASIC in C64, and i made couple of text adventures which were really cool btw, too bad i haven't found them from the old casettes. I don't really remember the BASIC syntax anymore, but i remember that debugging such spaghetti code was horrible.. ahh, goodtimes.. :tongue:
Posted on 2004-05-01 11:45:14 by Petroizki
Oldschool GWBASIC.
Posted on 2004-05-01 12:23:26 by iblis