my real name is Karl, and i USED to code alot in assembler, back when i had a 386, and made demoscene demos mostly in assembler, some 16 bit dos stuff, and 32 bit stuff writing our own dos extenders..
yet i don't know much a bout usng the floating point commands, nor optomising for the latest processors, especially the weird ways it seems newer pentiums rearrange code on the fly or whatever..
i did do a little MMX a few years back, but not much .. I am getting back into doing assembler stuff (well inline from msvc++)
i'm currently writing plugins for the program visualjockey (www.visualjockey.com)
and have come to the place of optomising my code into assembler and MMX if needed (maybe even sse, sse2 or whatever but i need more information on that (and on 3dnow) , but for most stuff i'll probably be happy with just MMX

so here i hope to be able to learn about optomising some code.. i hope to get to know everybody well.. i'll post my first questions soon.
Posted on 2004-06-02 00:21:34 by klumsy
Hi Karl,

Let me be the first to welcome you. I've been a member of the board for almost 2 years, but been coding in Assembler for almost 3 years. There are many more experienced asm programmers here and I'm pretty sure you'll learn what you need to know. Somebody almost always has a bit more experience in some or other field along the line. And I'm sure, as I have, you will start in one area, say MMX for example, then move into other areas to learn. I'm sure your experience in the demoscene will come in handy not only for yourself, but for others here too. We're all still learning, in one way or the other. If you want to get up to speed on pentium optimization, may I recommend Agner Fog's guide on Pentium optimization. Also the Intel PIII & PIV manuals are comprehensive enough to give you an edge. Agner though, is regarded by many, including myself as having the best in-depth guide to optimization. You can download his NEW guide from www.agner.org. The Agner Fog guide that comes bundled with MASM32 is old and outdated! It's smaller though, that's why Hutch includes it, and not the larger newer guide with MASM32. But it's a good starting point! Enjoy your stay!

Regards
Posted on 2004-06-02 01:04:33 by SubEvil
Welcome aboard Karl,
I have a similar background to yourself, and have been kicking around this board for about 4 years now.
When I joined, I had NO CLUE about x86 coding - my background is with the apple2, c64 and amiga scene (yeah, I'm old) - and even less of a clue about fpu. You have come to the right place !
Posted on 2004-06-02 01:12:36 by Homer
c64
thats my roots also.. 6502 (we;l 6510).. i did so much of that stuff, but forget so much also.. those were the good old days without even a MUL , one of the coolest tricks i did was use the 6502 also in the disk drive to do some 3d calculations in the background..

as for pc, plain vga, (well of course a variety of xmodes)
doing assembler in windows always seemed to intimidate me for some reason until visualjockey
Posted on 2004-06-02 04:37:47 by klumsy