I chose HLA because it was a relatively new programming experience for me. I wrote adventure games in BASIC for so long, that I grew tired of the language.

HLA -- on the other hand -- seems like a very interesting programming language. BASIC teaches somewhat backward fundamentals, but those have carried over into a plethora of BASIC interpreters and compilers over the years.

Just look at PowerBASIC and Liberty BASIC, to name a few. Despite flaws, non-Dartmouth BASIC has thrived for a long time. Now it is on the wane.

Basically, HLA is at once the most curious and most interesting language I have ever come across. Is it the best for writing text adventures? No. Inform or TADS, in my opinion, fit the bill better. But does HLA serve a useful purpose? Absolutely.

It was a challenge to write HLA Adventure because I was (and still am) so new to the language. But I love challenges. I wrote a few text adventures in Sylvain Bizorre's Mini-BASIC. I even tried one in HLA Basic. In fact, I squeezed a version of my game "Westfront PC: The Trials of Guilder" into a 24K version for the Commodore 64, Commodore Plus/4 and Vic-20:

http://www.geocities.com/dunric/pauladv.html

Text adventures are great fun, even if they don't usually display graphics (Magnetic Scrolls "The Pawn" is a good exception to this). I believe adventure games (especially text adventures) allow users to explore inner worlds within the mind. Infocom and Zork used a similar ad in the early 1980's when discussing the "power" of the brain in generating graphics.

So, to recap, I believe HLA was a challenge to write an adventure game in and so I picked that challenge instead of using another language (such as BASIC, which I have used so often that I can code an adventure game the size of HLA Adventure in under two weeks).

I have a lot to learn about programming. I am a novice at C/C++, I don't know Python, and I am still very inexperienced at HLA. BASIC is about the only language I know by heart.

Sincerely,

Paul Panks http://www.asmcommunity.net/board/cryptmail.php?tauntspiders=in.your.face@nomail.for.you&id=a8475aaa3588d07abb4db55616e41b12
Posted on 2004-06-11 18:29:40 by Paul Panks
text adventure sounds hella cool :-) When I was in 8th grade, one of my buddies came up with the idea of a program that would simulate being around my group of friends and I could like type things to them and they'd respond. I moved to implement it in QBASIC and well, I was no AI programmer for sure. Very very simplistic decision logic there, but it was a fun experience anyway!

As far as your games go, I think the next step up would be a game with a myst-like interface. Other than taking photos and manipulating them with photoshop, here is a page with links to three free graphics tools (one of them is GNU photoshoppish application):
http://www.hostileencounter.com/rts/rts_links_tools.htm

If you really wanted to go multimedia, you could always get a sound editor and add sound :-)

I chose HLA because it was a relatively new programming experience for me. I wrote adventure games in BASIC for so long, that I grew tired of the language.

HLA -- on the other hand -- seems like a very interesting programming language. BASIC teaches somewhat backward fundamentals, but those have carried over into a plethora of BASIC interpreters and compilers over the years.

Just look at PowerBASIC and Liberty BASIC, to name a few. Despite flaws, non-Dartmouth BASIC has thrived for a long time. Now it is on the wane.

Basically, HLA is at once the most curious and most interesting language I have ever come across. Is it the best for writing text adventures? No. Inform or TADS, in my opinion, fit the bill better. But does HLA serve a useful purpose? Absolutely.

It was a challenge to write HLA Adventure because I was (and still am) so new to the language. But I love challenges. I wrote a few text adventures in Sylvain Bizorre's Mini-BASIC. I even tried one in HLA Basic. In fact, I squeezed a version of my game "Westfront PC: The Trials of Guilder" into a 24K version for the Commodore 64, Commodore Plus/4 and Vic-20:

http://www.geocities.com/dunric/pauladv.html

Text adventures are great fun, even if they don't usually display graphics (Magnetic Scrolls "The Pawn" is a good exception to this). I believe adventure games (especially text adventures) allow users to explore inner worlds within the mind. Infocom and Zork used a similar ad in the early 1980's when discussing the "power" of the brain in generating graphics.

So, to recap, I believe HLA was a challenge to write an adventure game in and so I picked that challenge instead of using another language (such as BASIC, which I have used so often that I can code an adventure game the size of HLA Adventure in under two weeks).

I have a lot to learn about programming. I am a novice at C/C++, I don't know Python, and I am still very inexperienced at HLA. BASIC is about the only language I know by heart.

Sincerely,

Paul Panks
http://www.asmcommunity.net/board/cryptmail.php?tauntspiders=in.your.face@nomail.for.you&id=a8475aaa3588d07abb4db55616e41b12
Posted on 2004-10-01 23:31:08 by Al_Leitch
Hey another idea, how about you implement multiplayer networking into HLA adventure? Maybe everybody will think its a stupid idea for a text adventure, but it would be an interesting challenge for a text adventure game. Your's might even become the first network-enabled TAG created.
Posted on 2004-10-01 23:46:15 by Al_Leitch
Hey another idea, how about you implement multiplayer networking into HLA adventure? Maybe everybody will think its a stupid idea for a text adventure, but it would be an interesting challenge for a text adventure game. Your's might even become the first network-enabled TAG created.


I don't remember the name (never really was into adventure games), but I certainly do remember my students playing a real-time multiuser network-based text adventure game at UCR during the 1980s and 1990s.

It used ASCII-based "graphics", but other than that, pure text.
Cheers,
Randy Hyde
Posted on 2004-10-03 10:16:00 by rhyde
MUDs.
Posted on 2004-10-06 02:17:02 by Homer