Hi Guys,

A question for experienced(?) Windows Programmers:

I've just finished reading the chapter on creating a "Hello World" application from Randall Hyde's book, Windows Programming in Assembly.  I understand, well enough, how it works but I was wondering if I should attempt to learn how to type it out from memory; before continuing with the rest of the book.

For newbies, there's a lot of technique and concept to be digested in the beginning example, no doubt.  Is it generally recommended to really familiarize yourself with "Hello World", before moving on to the other stuff that builds on it.  I really want to have a solid, comfortable learning experience.

Otherwise it's all great fun!  Thanks for your all your help.
Posted on 2005-03-15 10:05:16 by Jaysen
Hi Jaysen,

Try to read the following tutorials. By the time, you will be familiar with the syntax and the logic of asm coding. The most important is to understand the concepts of asm coding. Post your questions to the forum and there will be peoples ready to help you.
Posted on 2005-03-15 13:13:40 by Vortex
yep, memorise the sourcecode, it will prove useful as a chatup line for the opposite sex ;p
Posted on 2005-03-15 14:18:08 by evlncrn8
Programming doesn't really require a lots of memorizing.  You have the book right next to you, why would you need to memorize what's in it.  If it wasn't for the code I've already written, and the excellent resources on the web, I wouldn't be able to program at all.  Lots of things I use in every program I write has only been typed once by me (or sometimes not at all).  Learn to love the Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V key combos, you'll need them.

On a side not, I've gone to a couple interviews of late where the asked me to take a test (on ASP no less) which I had a bit of trouble completing without my previous work or access to the internet.  I would advise you cram before you go for a programming interview if you know they want you to know a specific language.

Spara
Posted on 2005-03-15 18:56:12 by Sparafusile
Hi Guys,

If I've understood correctly, the only time I'll ever need to know it inside out is if I'm stuck on a deserted island with only a computer to keep myself busy.

Otherwise, there's very little (if not nothing) that can go completely wrong, regarding the mundane, generic aspects of creating and getting a blank form to appear on the screen.

My warmest thanks for all the advice.
Posted on 2005-03-16 02:03:54 by Jaysen

Hi Guys,

A question for experienced(?) Windows Programmers:

I've just finished reading the chapter on creating a "Hello World" application from Randall Hyde's book, Windows Programming in Assembly.? I understand, well enough, how it works but I was wondering if I should attempt to learn how to type it out from memory; before continuing with the rest of the book.

For newbies, there's a lot of technique and concept to be digested in the beginning example, no doubt.? Is it generally recommended to really familiarize yourself with "Hello World", before moving on to the other stuff that builds on it.? I really want to have a solid, comfortable learning experience.

Otherwise it's all great fun!? Thanks for your all your help.


Personally, I almost always "cut & paste" a skeletal Win32 program when doing Win32 GUI apps. I wouldn't bother memorizing the code.
Besides, a little later in the book you'll learn how to write a skeletal program that's even better than the "Hello World" variant.
Cheers,
Randy Hyde
Posted on 2005-03-22 18:39:37 by rhyde