I just recently was told that there will be as many as six flavors of Windows Vista available for purchase. I had a quick glance at the features of each package here and I came to conclusion that the Basic Home is sufficient for me.

I don't think I need any of their "productivity features" or most other BS they offer. I got my tools to do backups, remote login, and filesharing without Windows handling it for me.

I'm only worried about the processor and memory limitations they "support". Will 8GB of RAM be enough for the lifespan of Windows Vista? How about the physical CPU restriction?

What do you get and why? How about my choice of Basic Home? Is that appropriate for a coder?

edit: Url was wrong. Typical case of doing too many things at once.
Posted on 2006-11-07 11:27:29 by JimmyClif
I am desperately weaning myself off Windows. I just read an article that most people (sorry, don't remember what they meant by 'most') need something more than Basic Home.  For me, I think, it would be the $200 version.  But I've got five computers in my family unit and that is too much.
Posted on 2006-11-07 14:22:40 by drhowarddrfine
For me, it will be "Vista None".

I will hold on to WinXP as long as I can, and then hopefully there will be an alternative...
Posted on 2006-11-07 16:59:33 by f0dder

hopefully there will be an alternative...


I guess I'd better get crackin' on DynatOS... at this rate... I'll be at 32-bit DOS "standards" by the end of the decade :P
Posted on 2006-11-07 17:46:26 by SpooK
Doc,

I don't think you need to upgrade all five boxes. I got many many beautiful licenses for many many beautiful Windows Versions, ranging from 3.1 to XP, which I can use all over my house and I'm pretty sure that most people around here are in the same boat. Heck, I even own 2 ME licenses :(

I guess this will be the same as the transition from 98SE to XP. People say they don't need it but after awhile everyone will have it. Also, $200 isn't all that much of money anyways. I spend more money in the supermarket each week than that.

I also hope for an alternative - a good one would certainly drive the prices down and buying Microsoft products would be cheaper :P
Posted on 2006-11-07 18:58:45 by JimmyClif
I would have to go with the business edition, there are things I need that are not available in any of the home versions like remote desktop which I use every day. But for now I use Win2K and WinXP64 and am very happy with both, I see no pressing need to upgrade to Vista as it offers very little enhancement over what I already have and use. Should some kick-ass software be only available for Vista and I decide that I can't live without it then maybe I'll look at putting up the cash but for now there is nothing there that I don't already have or need.

Donkey
Posted on 2006-11-07 21:25:57 by donkey
What do they mean by "Number of supported network connections"?
Posted on 2006-11-08 07:56:09 by arafel
Just what it sounds like - #physical connections to local network and/or internet (some people have several connections for various reasons)
Posted on 2006-11-08 08:33:58 by Homer
Hmmm. Then 5 connections limit in the Home edition is too small imo. I already have all five allocated: 2 LAN, 2 for Vmware, and VPN.. and you can't never know when you'll be needing another one
Posted on 2006-11-08 09:35:33 by arafel
Donkey,

I also use a "remote desktop" daily. I use http://www.logmein.com which is free with a couple of minor annoyances. Like no direct filetransfer or printing support. I use it in conjunction with http://www.foldershare.com/ to have an convenient way to upload and download.
Posted on 2006-11-09 10:47:52 by JimmyClif
Hi Jimmy,

I do not have a choice of which software I use, that is governed by the parent of the company I work for. I regularly sign on to their servers and daily have to access to some files on my home PC. The boxes at work are running MS RD and I need to run that at home, a choice would be nice but because it is very critical software and data over an internet connection (PPTP) the company understandably requires that we adhere to the software they specify. After all, if everyone was running something of their choice how could IS troubleshoot a problem.

Donkey
Posted on 2006-11-09 20:29:42 by donkey
I got my copy of business version for free thanks to the "MSDN Academic Alliance" program which my academy takes part in. I'll be installing it next week just to see it in action ^^ The most important for me is DirectX10 API.

Greatest (IMHO) changes from version 9.0c:
- uses hardware frustum culling if the gfx card supports it
- API speed overhead reduced to 10-20% of the previous version.
- Texture tables: You no longer select one texture and then draw. Now, you select a texture table (up to 512 textures) and draw. The vertices themselves have a 'texture table index' in their definition.
- Constants buffers: 16 buffers (4096 bytes each) you can send to the geometry program
- Geometry program is now one, unified program (no separate programs for vertices and pixels)
- Geometry program is allowed to alter the geometry on higher a level of abstraction - not just primitives, like triangles, or pixels.
- Uses physics simulations if the card supports it. The idea is to add phycics processors to graphics cards. Actually, Geforce series 8 (GF8800) already support it.
- Geometry program is now even more high-level: it supports bitwise and logical operators, switch-case statement (the one from C/C++), and type casting. You can use any data for anything you wish. Data is now treated as a simple arrays of bytes - it's up to you what you do with it
(No division between 'textures', 'vertices', etc.)
- The number of registers has been increased to 4096   O_O !!!
- You can process up to 128 textures and 8 render targets simultaneously (limited by gfx card capabilitiess)
- max texture size is 8192x8192

It adds nicely to GF8800's caps:
- Geometry instancing (Renders up to billion instances of same geometry with a single call. Each instance can have its own parameters, like textures, lighting, shading, etc.). Provides incredible speedup in war games where there are many soldiers with same geometry and only different textures.
- 10-bit pair of RAMDACs and R11G11B10 color mode, so if your monitor supports 10-bit per color, the overall number of color increases from 16'777'216 to 1'073'741'824 :shock:
- Quantum Effects technology - provides physics simulation and rendering instructions
- High Dynamic Range Lighting
- The whole processing takes place using 128-bit floating point numbers. Every instruction, every register and every everything is a 128-bit floating point number ^^
- Lumenex Technology (provides incredible increase in rendered image quality)
- PureVideo Technology (provides incredible increase in quality when watching movies)

I suggest everyone reading about the last two, because they rule xD

I love DX10 and GF8800 <luv> I want to have my kids with them xD :P
Posted on 2007-01-13 14:12:05 by ti_mo_n
Too bad Microsoft are such bastards and will only do DX10 for Vista... I bet there's no real technical reason for this, and it's only done to make the piece of crap sell.
Posted on 2007-01-13 19:12:49 by f0dder
...and it will sell, because sooner or later there will be a game you want and it will be only available for DX10.

I read a story (in PC World) about Vista being slower in most of the tests as far as fps are concerned with the same hardware as XP. Using that as an excuse I decided to stay with XP for awhile.

I will eventually move on though.
Posted on 2007-01-13 19:29:51 by JimmyClif
I wonder if some reverse engineers will take it upon themselves to backport DX10 to XP - that'd be cute :)
Posted on 2007-01-13 19:32:39 by f0dder

For me, it will be "Vista None".

I will hold on to WinXP as long as I can, and then hopefully there will be an alternative...


Amen, ReactOS here we come!!!!

Ehtyar.
Posted on 2007-01-14 14:34:10 by Ehtyar


For me, it will be "Vista None".

I will hold on to WinXP as long as I can, and then hopefully there will be an alternative...


Amen, ReactOS here we come!!!!


Heh, dream on :)

It's a nice project, but if it ever gets "usable enough", MS will shut it down.
Posted on 2007-01-14 14:36:56 by f0dder