Hello,,
ok, basicly I urgently need to use SFS on win2k. I know it aint as secured as NTFS policies, but this is not the point. The environment is Win2k as file server (for file sharing only) and 16 Winxp pros as clients. Currently win2k is using ntfs policies.
After googling i found that there must be an option in folder options, view, "use simple file sharring (recommended)" which you can click or unclick! The problem is that on  my win2k there isnt any such option!

Going to connection properties : Client for Ms networks is installed.
Printer and file sharing is installed.

I am stucked!
Anybody any ideas how to get that option back plz???
Posted on 2007-09-12 14:01:45 by Ray
I think "simple file sharing" was introduced in XP - for 2k, as long as your users don't have blank passwords, perhaps you can try setting the NTFS permissions for your shares to let EVERYBODY have READ control ("write" and "full control" isn't a good idea letting EVERYBODY have).
Posted on 2007-09-12 18:19:41 by f0dder

I think "simple file sharing" was introduced in XP...


Yeah, they had something similar for 9x but I've never seen it on NT/2K until XP.
Posted on 2007-09-12 18:21:29 by SpooK
Ray,

On Windows 2000 make sure you have a computer name less that 15 characters since you are going to be using NetBEUI.  Make sure that the 16 WinXP machines and the Windows 2000 machine all have the same workgroup name. Once you've done that, you are basically prepped to setup NFS.

1.) Using explorer.exe click the folder you want to share. (hilight it)
2.) Right Click the folder name and select "Sharing and Security"
3.) Check "Share this folder on the network"
... If you want users to be able to modify files check "Allow network users to change my files"
4.) Click "Apply" and click "OK" to close the window.

If everything went okay, which I don't guarrantee anything,  other users on the network will be able to see the folder under "My Network Places" on their desktop (or whereever). On the remote end, to make accessing the folder easier, you could map the folder as a drive by opening explorer.exe, selecting the "Tools" option from the menu and select "Map Network Drive". When the dialog box appears, select a drive letter from the list click the browse button to find the shared folder, then once "Drive:" and "Folder:" have been filled out you can click the "Finish" button to have the dialog map you a new drive letter. It's pretty straight forward, Win2K and XP machines work well together. Just to note, you kept refering to the Win2K machine as a "File Server" does this mean you are using Windows Server 2000 or are you just meaning that you are going to use the Windows 2000 box as a server. I'm wondering because if it's not Windows Server 2000 you might run into issues with the number of users you are wanting to support, 16 are a little much considering the supposed maximum limit of clients supported on a Windows 2000 Professional machine is 10 (same as peer-to-peer networking). Just something you might want to keep in mind.

Regards,
Bryant Keller

Posted on 2007-09-12 21:02:37 by Synfire
first of all, let me thank you all for your replies.
I must admit, i am a bit confused about all these..
Now, when i was saying win2k i was referring to windows server 2000 indeed.

Let me ask a simple question, actually this is what i am trying to do here..
I want to create 100 folders on win2k server, share those folders with different share names, and assign password for FULL access to each one of them.

Now, i need to be able from every winxp (i have 16 winxp pros) to be able to connect to each and every one folder (of those 100) but before establishing the mapping/connection the user must supply his/her password and if needed the username, for full access!

example: One time user RAY may use Winxp 1 to connect to his folder, and some other time user RAY may use Winxp 2 to connect to his folder!

Very simple and stupid way to network computers but anyway..As if I swap Windows 2000 server with Win98!

Hope I am clear.
Posted on 2007-09-13 03:15:48 by Ray

Let me ask a simple question, actually this is what i am trying to do here..
I want to create 100 folders on win2k server, share those folders with different share names, and assign password for FULL access to each one of them.

AFAIK that's not possible - you need each user to have a user account on the server as well (or move to domain authentication)... add all the users to a group, and allow that group access to your folders.
Posted on 2007-09-13 04:42:58 by f0dder
What you need to do is setup an active directory server to manage your accounts for you. This can be done from your windows server 2k box. Once active directory is setup you're users can move from one computer to another and use whats called "roaming accounts" where the account can be used no matter what computer they are on. Unfortunately, I've only dealt with setting up active directory on 2k3 so I'm not exactly sure how you would go about doing it on your 2k machine, but I know it's probably different because there are settings on 2k3 you have to change if you are going to be on a network with 2k machines. UPDATE: Found directions for installing Active Directory on Win2K; for normal users and for dummies.

Once you have active directory setup, users can login on any of your networked WinXP machines. The next step would just be to enable the file sharing and setup group policies for the users to access the files/folders. In your example, you can have multiple "generic" accounts with passwords and have those accounts set to a specific group, then add the users to the group that you want to have access to that folder. This way, when the user logs in to access the folder, the group permissions will grant them access. EDIT: seems f0dder beat me to the punch. Once you have all that setup, it should work the way you want it.
Posted on 2007-09-13 04:56:38 by Synfire
f00der: domain authentication?! Active directory?

Synfire: great, i will start googling since you didnot provide any links:)

ill be back with more:)
Posted on 2007-09-13 06:28:02 by Ray
Ray: Active Directory, yes, "domain auth" meaning that you don't need to create 16 user accounts on each client machine, but create the user accounts on the (domain) server instead.
Posted on 2007-09-13 06:57:02 by f0dder
Synfire: great, i will start googling since you didnot provide any links:)


I most certainly did post links, I posted two of them...



Those are links, that's why the text is blue.

Regards,
Bryant Keller
Posted on 2007-09-13 14:54:27 by Synfire
However the links are a little bit broken:

http://%22http//www.petri.co.il/how_to_install_active_directory_on_w2k.htm%22 (for normal users)

http://%22http//www.petri.co.il/how_to_install_active_directory_on_w2k_for_lamers.htm%22 (for dummies)

Here the corrected ones:
for normal users
for dummies
Posted on 2007-09-13 15:07:17 by LocoDelAssembly
heh, my bad. I quoted the URL :lol:
Posted on 2007-09-13 16:07:46 by Synfire
ok, went over the links (thanks a lot btw), and have a question: can i assign every user a specific folder? so as every time a user logs in, the root directory to be the folder i specify somehow..

thanks.
Posted on 2007-09-14 06:30:47 by Ray
It's starting to sound to me like you are trying to setup "virtual shell environments" like what you can do with CHROOT in UNIX/Linux but on Windows. If this is the case, you can't really do that in any realistically usable manner with Windows alone. You are going to need some kind of third party application. There is a commercial application called WinJail which boasts that it can be used for...

For ease of administration reasons.When a computer is used by many users it is needed to establish a clean cut between their services, mainly for security. For example, it can be used in Internet Cafe. WinJail allows each user work in his or her own environment safely and easily backup and delete all user files after his/her work is finished.


Pretty close to what I think you are talking about. WinJail is available at http://www.winquota.com/wj/winjail_desktop.html in both trial and commercial versions. It's actually nicknamed "Chroot for Windows". I haven't used it but from it's descriptions it looks pretty close. But to my knowlege I can't think of any way you are going to be able to modify the user root directory without a third party application.

Sorry.
Posted on 2007-09-14 22:17:00 by Synfire
Would this be a situation where standard FTP would be a feasible alternative (e.g. for pure file sharing) for you to employ?
Posted on 2007-09-14 22:27:28 by SpooK
Synfire: guilty as charged :lol: Ill have a look on the soft:)

spook:not good.
Posted on 2007-09-15 03:35:37 by Ray
Btw, SAMBA can map a share depending on host/user... might be possible to do something similar with NT server, at least if you use logon scripts and map a drive to a UNC path...
Posted on 2007-09-15 05:09:33 by f0dder

Btw, SAMBA can map a share depending on host/user... might be possible to do something similar with NT server, at least if you use logon scripts and map a drive to a UNC path...



Which would have been my next question after basic FTP :P
Posted on 2007-09-15 11:26:31 by SpooK

Btw, SAMBA can map a share depending on host/user... might be possible to do something similar with NT server, at least if you use logon scripts and map a drive to a UNC path...



Holly shit F0d !!
This is it:) ( I think ! hehe)
I always assumed  samba was for linux/unix !
Ill google for installation/setup instructions!
if you have anything ready, its welcomed:)
Posted on 2007-09-15 12:15:21 by Ray
Samba is just for UNIX/Linux systems. If you are trying to chroot your users to a specific area, you might be well enough to map a drive to the disk as I talked about earlier.. but you still have to find a way to jail the user to that drive. Windows implementations don't have that ability and to my knowlege you can't virtually map over a section of the C: drive. On UNIX\Linux you can, it's no issue, just mount to that directory and the new partition shows up instead of that directory. I used to do that with /etc on servers all the time (have default /etc configurations underneith a mounted /etc in case something went wrong I can just umount the /etc modify the startup script to keep it from mounting the new /etc then reboot with the safe *default* /etc) for rescue/troubleshooting purposes. But I'm pretty certain nothing like that is available for Windows. That's why I suggested the WinJail type programs. Programs like that would most likely install a device driver, hijack file access routines and restrict users to specified drives/folders/files. Commercial versions like WinJail would most likely do more complex stuff but that's kinda the basic idea. You are most likely going to have to do some kind of hack job to get what you want done.
Posted on 2007-09-15 19:29:47 by Synfire