Someone emailed me looking for a Reverser:
SGIS currently has a need for a Reverse Engineer.

JOB DESCRIPTION: Reverse Engineer
Work as a member of the Applied Technology Unit (ATU) of the Joint Task Force for Global Network Operations (JTF-GNO), located in Arlington, VA. Essential Functions: Work with debuggers and disassembles to perform reverse engineering, forensic examinations, and system reviews.

REQUIRED SKILLS: Minimum of 5+ years of experience, including extensive DoD / federal government experience. Skilled in Olly Dbg, IDA Pro, Soft ICE, Linux gdb/ Assembly, C/C++. Good understanding of operating system internals, low level and high level software concepts, and an understanding of the various types of malicious code (i.e trojans, worms, toolkits etc.). Can work with minimal guidance. skilled in the use of system monitoring tools like regmon, filemon, process explorer, process monitor etc.

REQUIRED EDUCATION: BS Degree

REQUIRED CLEARANCE: Candidate must have DOD TS/SCI clearance

LOCATION: Arlington, VA

Heather Oldham
Resource Manager

1000 Corporate Drive
Suite 280
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334
Tel: 954-566-4771
Fax: 954-208-0227
Posted on 2008-03-18 23:07:29 by bitRAKE
REQUIRED CLEARANCE: Candidate must have DOD TS/SCI clearance
How do you get that? :)
Posted on 2008-03-19 04:21:38 by f0dder
you make up a bogus report on weapons of mass destruction being present in some country, make some photoshopped up maps, and send them to your local fed office..... i guess...
Posted on 2008-03-19 05:14:44 by evlncrn8

Can work with minimal guidance. skilled in the use of system monitoring tools like regmon, filemon, process explorer, process monitor etc.

So he can also "double click" ? hu ?
Posted on 2008-03-19 10:38:43 by Dite

REQUIRED CLEARANCE: Candidate must have DOD TS/SCI clearance
How do you get that? :)


If you do not already have one then don't plan on getting one any time soon as it takes well over a year and a ton of money!

With that level of security clearance the feds will need to beat down every door of everyone you ever came in contact with from birth (not really but you get the point of how hard it is to get).

Posted on 2008-03-19 14:06:24 by madprgmr
madprgmr: didn't plan on getting one, just wondering what it takes - I live in .dk, so probably couldn't apply anyway :)
Posted on 2008-03-19 19:49:44 by f0dder

madprgmr: didn't plan on getting one, just wondering what it takes - I live in .dk, so probably couldn't apply anyway :)


f0dder:

This article covers it all:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A52768-2003Feb10&notFound=true
Posted on 2008-03-19 20:17:57 by madprgmr
Furthermore, it isn't uncommon to have a clearance rating without even knowing what level of clearance one has. It isn't as black and white as popular press makes it seem. Many jobs require a basic background check: they seem more concerned about people paying their bills and being in good standing with the law than with where they are from. Which is kind of lame because anyone susceptible to being bought could also have a gun put to their family. I guess the later situation is easier to detect/prevent. Anyhow, greater clearance can be granted as one advances with government. There are always levels to communication in government, so the transition is transparent.

I'm going out on a limb here, but my initial impression from email is that they don't really know what they are looking for in terms of skillset. It could just be the human resource person's limited knowledge of the position, but the description of the job points in that direction as well. Not a position I want to move across the country for.
Posted on 2008-03-20 09:59:37 by bitRAKE
Well the job does sound interesting. Getting paid to do reserve engineering.  ;)
Posted on 2008-03-21 01:02:55 by roticv
Yeah, that would certainly be an interesting job, but you quite likely won't be able to tell anyone about it due to having signed a nondisclosure form.
Posted on 2008-03-30 14:51:42 by Bobbias

Well the job does sound interesting. Getting paid to do reserve engineering.  ;)


While the job does sound very interesting; the major drawback that I can see (at least from my perspective) is that your hands are tied (as to how you can do things and why) by a ton of regulations and procedures that you "MUST' follow as the information that you are obtaining is to be used for more than likely legal purposes and thusly any deviation from the regulations could cause things to be tossed out.

Just remember, its not like they show on TV or the movies where you get to be a rouge engineer tearing things apart any way that you can conceive of.  This job comes with a ton of paperwork that must be done along with a ton of rules of engagement.

Now if you want to get paid to do reserve engineering, have the ability to use all of your skills (and develop new ones) along with really enjoying the challenge (without all of the paperwork and regulations) then you need to work in a Research and Development section of a company.

Posted on 2008-04-04 12:17:09 by madprgmr