Hi there, I've always been fascinated by assemby even if I'm not a developer...

I've been in touch with many asm-os projects but i finally understood that it's really difficoult to build a functional alternative OS in asm.

BTW I believe that it would be really great to exploit the machine-code power for heavy tasks as a/v encoding. Not only: I also believe that such kind of product could have great diffusion too.
I can already imagine a standalone player/recorder with an embedded/minimal asm OS that can manage realtime DVD playing while transcoding.

So as I already suggested to many asm-coded os (such as menuet, Kolibri, Dex and octa), DVD4DOS could be the starting point:

DVD PLAYER for 16bit DOS systems!!!

Minimal requirements:

-486DX computer (486 with built-in FPU)
-4/8/16 or more MB of RAM (I don't know...I have 64MB...)
-SVGA card (640x480 resolution and 8/15/16/24/32 color bits/pixel)
-SB Pro or compatible soundcard (11025 Hz, 8 bit, stereo)
-DVD drive with drivers installed (CDROM.SYS included in the package)
-a single layer and region-free DVD movie disc
-lots of spare time because DVD4DOS Beta1 is not a realtime player
and very slow...(tested with my Pentium 120 MHz computer...
transcoding 1 min movie takes cca. 1 hour)


Third party free softwares included and used:

-VOBSPLIT (file splitter) by Anastasis Chatzioglou (Anasto) (2000)
-DECODEVOB (A/V demux) source from the web (by ?) (DOS ported by me) (2003)
-MPEG2DEC (MPEG2 video decoder) by MSSG (1994)
-CMPEG (MPEG1 encoder) by Stefan Eckart (1993)
-MPXPLAY (AC3 decoding) by PDSoft, Padar Attila (2003)
-DISPLAY (MPEG1 playing) by Jih-Shin Ho (1993-1995)
-CDROM.SYS Acer cdrom device driver which can read single-layer DVD
-see doc's for more info on included parts...

All other parts designed coded and compiled by Horvath Istvan, (2003.)


As you can see it's very sloooooooow but an assembly re-code/optimization could boost it up.

I don't know if it's useful or not, BTW I hope that at least inspires.
Posted on 2008-10-18 05:20:16 by forart.eu
That's some ancient slow + power-inefficient PC you have.
AV re-encoding? Funny, that's only useful in 3 cases:
1) to put the video on your $500 PDA
2) to rip a DVD, maybe stream to TCP - (which needs high-end hardware)?
3) to record SDTV or HDTV - which requires a $200+ capture-card and drivers for a supported OS.

You can't push a weak cpu and a byte of RAM to do the impossible. When adding features, where do you stop adding? Just install Ubuntu/whatever, and that's it. On the extremely cheap current low-end PCs. You'll need a large HDD anyway (for the movies). You'll need enough RAM to do the decoding/encoding anyway. You'll need enough MHz, too.
Posted on 2008-10-18 20:37:03 by Ultrano

That's some ancient slow + power-inefficient PC you have.


I'm on Athlon64 3700+ / 2x1Gb DDR400 @ dual channel / 2x500Gb sata HD @ RAID0 / PCI-E 256 Mb DDR3 video card, to be clear.

This don't means that a portable 100% assembly backup tool (a specialized OS on a USB key) would be helpful anyway, IMHO.
Imagine this: get a BD, your USB-key tool/os, a decent PC (P4/AthlonXP at least): plug the key and insert the BD.
Sit back and watch the movie while backup it on the key (even better if with free codecs, such as Dirac/Theora-Vorbis).

I also believe that such kind of tool/OS could be embedded by standalone players/recorders...

It could be THE killer app for assembly OSes.
Posted on 2008-10-28 05:43:19 by forart.eu


That's some ancient slow + power-inefficient PC you have.

Imagine this: get a BD, your USB-key tool/os, a decent PC (P4/AthlonXP at least): plug the key and insert the BD.
Sit back and watch the movie while backup it on the key (even better if with free codecs, such as Dirac/Theora-Vorbis).

I could also imagine problems with copyright infringement for making unauthorized copies of the movie
being watched. :lol:
Posted on 2008-10-28 21:33:29 by rags
I could also imagine problems with copyright infringement for making unauthorized copies of the movie
being watched. :lol:

We're talking about BACKUPS (means that you own the original disc) not copies.

You have any right to make a BACKUP copy (even in a different format, for example DVD -> VCD or MPEG4) if you own the original disc. In this specific case, it would be great to backup a BD to DVD if you don't own a standalone BD player, but you have the PC reader.
Posted on 2008-10-29 05:35:40 by forart.eu
I don't see the point of a specialized "OS" for this, you aren't really going to gain anything over running a usermode application on a regular OS. Even if designing a standalone player, you might as well toss linux on it.

As for "right to make backups" - ho humm. We're supposed to have that in Denmark, since blank media are taxed with a fee for exactly this reason. But I'm not sure of the legality of doing the actual backups, there's been a lot of politician/lobbyist dancing back and forth. And in the Amerikan states, even if you have the backup right, you will be violating DMCA because DVD and BD/HD discs have copy protection mechanisms to prevent copying/backups. And considering how important the media lobby is in USA, DMCA probably weighs heavier than any other right you might have.
Posted on 2008-10-29 08:04:20 by f0dder
In Australia, we have the legal right to make one personal backup of any electromagnetic media, provided that we own an original copy, and have a sale receipt for it (ffs) - however Australia is a signatory to the DMCA and is subject to it and my understanding is no longer clear, perhaps I'll ask my uncle who is a QC.
I suspect that our cosigning of DMCA does not constitute law here, it's only a treaty which I personally have not signed, making me a criminal outside of my own country for offences which are perfectly legal under our legal system... taking that logic a step further, it was signed by a government which is no longer in power, and was not ratified by the people through referendum or any other process.
I would furthermore suggest that the USA has not been a good global citizen, and would not press its few remaining allies over corporate proprietary issues.

Finally, I must say I think it is not the legal issue of a software vendor - the end user is responsible for their use or misuse of the product, the EULA says so.
Posted on 2008-10-29 12:45:06 by Homer
Homer, that reasoning might be well and good, but keep in mind how much power the media lobbyists have - when Jon Lech Johansson released the DeCSS sourcecode, he didn't do anything illegal according to Norwegian law... still, "somebody" put enough pressure on Norway that his home got raided by the police, and every piece of electronic gadget (including his cellphone) was raided.

Also, considering the compulsory ISP filtering stuff happening in Australia, I wouldn't put too much faith in your current government either :/
Posted on 2008-10-29 18:40:34 by f0dder

The idea of filtering of ISPs was scrapped in favor of a software solution.

This software was to be distributed for compulsary use in all schools and gov buildings, and made available by choice to the public, our gov paid some ridiculous amount of money for the software.
Several days later a schoolboy was showing the world how to bypass this "sophisticated filter".

That's all a matter public record.
However there is still the Echelon program, which saw all our exchanges digitalized and made "remote wiretap friendly", and there's still our "defence signals department" (aka Small Signals), whose job is to listen to everything at all times.

As for having faith in government, I don't trust any politician, anywhere in the world.


Posted on 2008-10-29 20:40:06 by Homer

As for having faith in government, I don't trust any politician, anywhere in the world.

:lol:
Here in the US, you can go to a photography studio for portraits and also buy a cd
with photos on it from that session.
Unless the photographer gives you a written release along with it, most places that
print photographs won't allow you to make prints of the photos on the cd.
So you're stuck printing lower quality photos at home, even after paying alot of money
for that cd. :sad:
Posted on 2008-10-30 04:29:11 by rags
Two cool (related) news:

Finally handling BD+ - open source BD+ decript tools

Theora 1.0 released

Hope that inspires...
Posted on 2008-11-05 05:22:33 by forart.eu