I have a KingstonTC5X86-133-DE overclocker chip with a fan mounted to it.

It's a modified  AMD DX5-133 processor (Rev. B1) Onboard Intel DX4-100 processor (Rev. C1) ... Power Supply Voltage +5 V 5%, Power Consumption Max. : 3 A @ +5 V ...

The fan is connected to 2 of the chip connector pins.

Does these specs mean that the fan uses 5 volts to run?

Thanks.
Posted on 2009-09-13 14:30:17 by skywalker
I uses 15W to run, which means consuming 3A at 5V. So it means that you should connect it to a 5V source capable of sourcing at least 3A (15W of power).
Posted on 2009-09-13 17:11:16 by ti_mo_n
Sounds extreme, doesnt it?
3 amps just to turn around a tiny little fan :|
And I bet they used telephony wire, rated at 1A !!!

Compare that to my power supply, 500 watts at 240 volts, equals roughly 2 AMPS for the ENTIRE SYSTEM (dvd burner's laser is like 15mW)

And I have three fans in there, one on the cpu and 2 on the case, so I'm quite amused at your implied statement that the fan might draw 3 amps at ANY voltage!
Posted on 2009-09-14 02:18:41 by Homer

Sounds extreme, doesnt it?
3 amps just to turn around a tiny little fan :|
And I bet they used telephony wire, rated at 1A !!!

Compare that to my power supply, 500 watts at 240 volts, equals roughly 2 AMPS for the ENTIRE SYSTEM (dvd burner's laser is like 15mW)

And I have three fans in there, one on the cpu and 2 on the case, so I'm quite amused at your implied statement that the fan might draw 3 amps at ANY voltage!


Yeah, 3-300 mA would sound much more... realistic. Take a closer look at the fan/specs and see if it says .3 A (with a decimal point), which would equate to 300 mA.
Posted on 2009-09-14 10:56:27 by SpooK