ARM is popular in the embedded world, but not in the desktop market.
I wonder why.
Maybe because Windows (the majority OS in desktop) doesn't run on ARM (except Windows CE) ?
Posted on 2010-07-26 02:16:11 by anta40

ARM is popular in the embedded world, but not in the desktop market.
I wonder why.
Maybe because Windows (the majority OS in desktop) doesn't run on ARM (except Windows CE) ?


I think you've answered your own question there.
x86 is entrenched pretty deeply in the desktop world. Windows, MacOS, and also linux to a certain extent. Although you can run linux on ARM, it is more difficult to get software working there. There will be less precompiled packages available, and not all open source software may be portable enough to compile to ARM out-of-the-box.

People always complain about the vendor lock-in that Microsoft has with Windows. But I personally think that the x86 hardware lock-in is an even bigger issue. Then again, I grew up in the golden age of home computers, and my first few computers were not x86 powered. I guess the younger generation have just accepted x86 without even thinking about it. It's a fact of life to them, because that's just what virtually all computers use. The question of "what CPU does this computer use" may never even have occured to them (aside from Intel vs AMD perhaps).
Posted on 2010-07-26 03:15:44 by Scali
I just discovered that xkcd ad a bunch of high-quality forums.
http://forums.xkcd.com/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=62695
Posted on 2010-07-29 02:46:16 by HeLLoWorld
(previous link related to topic)
Posted on 2010-08-03 14:37:03 by HeLLoWorld