Hi,
does anyone know any good OS programming tutorials?
Like some, that start at the very beginning, in case you'd like to start out an OS from scratch??


PredeX
Posted on 2002-04-28 16:08:45 by PredeX
There is a OS tutorial project on Sourceforge.net. But don't ask me for the name...
Posted on 2002-04-28 16:41:55 by bazik

Hi,
does anyone know any good OS programming tutorials?
Like some, that start at the very beginning, in case you'd like to start out an OS from scratch??


PredeX
Writing an OS requires a certain quantity of experience which will make anyway tutorials rather useless, and thus very hard to find. But these pages offer some valuable practical information at least:

http://www.nondot.org/sabre/os/articles

http://www.beyondlogic.org/

http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Peaks/8600/device.html
Posted on 2002-04-28 16:53:00 by Maverick
Hi
Maybe try looking at Jean Labrosse Book. Think the title is "Embedded systems OS" or something similar.

Edit: "MicroC/OS-2, The Real Time Kernel"

While not for PC's it will run on a PC and gives a very good grounding in OS and their issues.
Also his code (C) is like poetry, beautiful to read.
Maybe your local library has the book.

Cheers
Kim:)
Posted on 2002-04-28 18:43:37 by fiddler
I am also working (when i find the time) to my own OS so you can ask me questions via email or here ...

AFAIK Spook is also working to his OS.

For a very good working example with source code you can check Menuet OS. Its a full ASM OS and did i mention it is open source also ;)

www.menuetos.org

i have posted some working demo of my OS and its GUI here on this board (serach older posts smthing about "My GUI Demo") and i will post new versions here also... i have not released the sourcecode yet...but maybe i will.

Besides that you need a lot of patience (join the "triple fault club :) " ) and also a lot of knowledge about today and yesterday hardware...

some other usefuul links are:
http://www.azillionmonkeys.com/qed/os.html
http://alexfru.chat.ru/eindex.html
http://home.no.net/tkos/info/hd.html

and many many others

I wonder if i release the source code and keep the copyright (but make it a free OS) and also keep project leadership (kind of "my way") will there be any guys wanting to help me/us make a new ASM OS?

Like in a join effort to keep the best from ASM... we could convert the code snippets/gems we know into OS API and KetilO will make a RAD and i make a RTS and Ewayne OOP and Hiro makes www and Iczelion makes tutorials and VX, Hutch makes ... .... hehe dream on

(that was a question for the recruitment i guess)
Posted on 2002-04-29 01:23:43 by BogdanOntanu
Thx for all your answers, I really appreciate it.


There is a OS tutorial project on Sourceforge.net. But don't ask me for the name...


If its called Miranda OS, Im going to join them soon :)


Writing an OS requires a certain quantity of experience which will make anyway tutorials rather useless, and thus very hard to find.


Im looking for tutorials dealing with the matter in general ways to get some sort of idea. And of course it requires experience, but also devotion. Lacking experience can be made up by practicing and thats exactly what im striving for


Intel 32 Architecture Software Developers Manual, Volume III, System Programming Guide.


Where do I find this guide? developer.intel.com ? do you find it on the developers' insight CD-Rom?

PredeX
Posted on 2002-04-29 07:33:44 by PredeX
Hi Im hexcoder, I dont know how to addressing Variable. Come on Guys, does anyone here have a 'RealMen' Spirit? Im now writing "RealMen Plus-Plus", It gonna be Great.
Posted on 2003-04-28 07:58:16 by realvampire
RealMen? More like RealWasteOfTime. It can be beneficial to know how to do it, but coding in hex? Useless.
Posted on 2003-04-28 08:20:39 by f0dder

RealMen? More like RealWasteOfTime. It can be beneficial to know how to do it, but coding in hex? Useless.


I'll proof it to you, you're wrong. Remember, the HLL coder think programming on Asm is useless and annoying too. But we know it was not. :alright:
Posted on 2003-04-28 18:50:37 by realvampire
Yes, and coding in hex gives you the possiblilty of making nightmare read out code (is it two instrucitons or one an' a half? jmp $+1, or is it just xchg eax,eax unoptimized?) hehehe... :grin: :grin: :grin:

(faster/smaller/bigger/slower code is just a bonus ;))
Posted on 2003-04-28 23:51:32 by scientica

I'll proof it to you, you're wrong. Remember, the HLL coder think programming on Asm is useless and annoying too. But we know it was not.

Most HLL programmers indeed think it's useless doing 100% asm coding - hell, even in embedded systems. Most of the acknowledge the benefit of optimizing parts in assembly, though.

Now, just what is the benefit of programming in hex? Unless you need some _very_ weird opcodes, you can get a 1:1 translation from your mnemonics (asm file) to the output binary... and that's of course letting the assembler handle symbol relocation, giving you symbolic names, and generally be a hell of a lot easier to read.
Posted on 2003-04-29 01:42:44 by f0dder

Now, just what is the benefit of programming in hex? Unless you need some _very_ weird opcodes, ...
Makes me think of the Hugi Size Compo - those guys are amazing! Can you imagine if all code was wrote that way - what fun! Forget the hardrive - all programs would be in battery backed RAM.
Posted on 2003-04-29 02:15:58 by bitRAKE
hehe, hugi is fun... but imagine writing something that does "a little more than that"... eek :)
Posted on 2003-04-29 02:33:49 by f0dder
From that slide...

Bit 0 (MSB) of CR0 is used to set paging on/off.

Does that guy number the bits in reverse?
Posted on 2003-04-29 02:52:14 by f0dder
Uuups..., miss pressed button. BTW hiro, please arrange my Opcode on the last post.
Posted on 2003-04-29 03:55:11 by realvampire
it's not complex, it's just a hell of a lot of unecessary manual labour.
Posted on 2003-04-29 04:01:36 by f0dder

it's not complex, it's just a hell of a lot of unecessary manual labour.

:o Okay then...., :stupid:
Posted on 2003-04-29 04:03:29 by realvampire

From that slide...

Does that guy number the bits in reverse?

I think he does, I reacted on it too. :-/
Posted on 2003-04-29 11:46:39 by scientica
Yes most people seem to have trouble understanding that
LSB is bit#0
MSB is bit #31

and that bit#0 if located at far right and bit#31 is located at far left in drawings :)

MSB-bit#31 ..... bit#15 .... LSB-bit#0

I think we should post a FAQ about this or something
Posted on 2003-04-29 13:23:59 by BogdanOntanu
I am also working (when i find the time) to my own OS so you can ask me questions via email or here ...

AFAIK Spook is also working to his OS.


Sorry for the 3 year delay, but yes... I am still working on my OS ;)

Under the Project Information section at my website is all the current information on the project status. I am not far from my first Alpha release (within the next few months) :)
Posted on 2005-02-23 14:00:50 by SpooK