Well, they did also take off the heatsink in those THG videos - but I doubt
the fastest athlon CPUs would survive long if the fan stops.
Posted on 2002-09-09 17:52:00 by f0dder
Well if one would fail in burnign the CPU that way, the CPU atleast is fast; maybe too fast for the other periphials, I don't think they would survive...

Athlons - made by AMD. AMD - cooling =
Posted on 2002-09-10 09:22:08 by scientica
I dont know about people in your specific area, but I have never heard of an AMD CPU burning down, my CPU is 900Mhz T-Bird Socket A (I know, not that fast!) but it stays cool, even under full load. I doubt u can fry an AMD CPU easily, besides my motherboard is pretty old and it will shut the PC off if the fan fails and wont start until a working fan is plugged in.
Posted on 2002-09-11 07:27:35 by x86asm
x86... AMD CPU's are pretty easy to fry... If you are overclocking or using a substandard cooler... But with normal use and a fairly good cooler there's no need to worry... But they do run a lot hotter than Intel CPU's
Posted on 2002-09-11 07:51:26 by NervGaz
Maybe I'm a bit pro-Intel in this question, but my brother has a 1G AMD (think it's a duron); And so far it has survied him... :grin: :grin: :grin:
When using an AMD CPU without overclocking them and use the standard cooler, I assuem it will stay cool. But the mother boards (or is it in the CPU?) for intel CPUs there are some overheat protection (system slow/freze down or system off), do you thing that will be "stanard" for the "Hammer mobos" (modo that support the Hammer)?
Posted on 2002-09-11 09:47:28 by scientica
Most motherboards have a heat detector, you can set the bios to shutdown if it exceeds x temp.

My AMD has done this twice, and its set at 65 degrees C - can you say 'hot'

as to EMP to destroy pc's - this will work but destroy you own - HERF would disable a PC and is fairly directional - but the PC cases are essentially faraday cages (much like car bodies etc) so the power needed to disable even a normal pc could be quite high.

The horn antenna would need to be large to direct the RF etc, so not something that can be done unnoticed.

Maverick - love your 'undocumented opcodes' , word of caution, you gotta watch out for the VSS - those white collars are not just for show ..... nuf said
Posted on 2002-09-11 14:24:24 by Terab
There's this guy on another forum I go to that has an 1Ghz T-Bird o/c'ed @ 1549Mhz!! HE had it that way for the last 6 months or so. Plus the new AthlonXP's arent that much hotter than Intel.
Posted on 2002-09-11 18:51:04 by x86asm
Posted on 2002-09-11 23:06:34 by GogetaSSJ4
Quoting from that site:
Well just when you thought it couldn't happen to you, it does. Last night I Posted on 2002-09-11 23:30:04 by stryker

Maybe I'm a bit pro-Intel in this question, but my brother has a 1G AMD (think it's a duron); And so far it has survied him... :grin: :grin: :grin:
When using an AMD CPU without overclocking them and use the standard cooler, I assuem it will stay cool. But the mother boards (or is it in the CPU?) for intel CPUs there are some overheat protection (system slow/freze down or system off), do you thing that will be "stanard" for the "Hammer mobos" (modo that support the Hammer)?


Umm I think you're reffering to the thermal throttling thingy in the p4's... It works so that when you overheat the CPU it sends some sort of signal to the motherboard wich in turn lowers the clock speed of the FSB so the CPU doesn't run as fast, wich means that the output of W is lowered... It's pretty reliable as long as you don't overclock... Then it becomes sort of f****d up... I think soembody already reffered to the video that was on THG a while back... it shows this exact thing... They test one pIII, one p4, one Athlon T-Bird, and one Athlon XP... Both Athlons burn, the pIII hangs, and the p4 just slows down... Oh yaeh the test is: while running a QuakeIIIA demo the remove the HSF's from the CPU's
Posted on 2002-09-12 04:28:33 by NervGaz
Tjena NervGaz,
It doesn't send a signal to the motherboard, it all happens inside the CPU. The clock is inhibited for a certain quantity of time, then allowed for another certain quantity of time. The duty cycle of this gives how much the CPU is slowed down. On average (being the inhibit/allow cycle very fast) one has the sensation that the MHz were reduced.
This info is somewhere perhaps in the 4th manual (Pentium4/Xeon Optimizations), or in the 3rd one (System stuff) of the IA32 manuals.
Posted on 2002-09-12 04:42:58 by Maverick
Oh yeah... My bad... It's been a while since I checked up on the info about that stuff... I think it was ars thecnica that had a pretty good article about it when the whole thing became known... Oh well thanks for straightening that out... My guess is that just uses the HLT instruction to inhibit the duty cycle...
Posted on 2002-09-12 05:09:57 by NervGaz