Before i wanted to learn C++ for some reason but b/c of small is beatiful i change my mind to learn asm however where should i start dos or windows. If dos could you please leave a hello world example.
Posted on 2002-01-23 15:10:49 by k0d
Have a look there !

Welcome to the community ! :)
Posted on 2002-01-23 15:43:52 by JCP
Hi KOD,

I happy see you here, I have a Assembly forum and only Turkish language. If you wish every time i'm waiting.

http://pub96.ezboard.com/bbsca2001

have nice day,

CYDONIA
Posted on 2002-01-23 16:41:56 by CYDONIA
I think DOS is a good way to begin. Because you deal directly with the memory segments and offsets, and also you need more use of the registers; in DOS programming moving data between registries is something continuous. Anyway, you should be using DOS for a week or two, and then begin directly with Windows. You will be fresh of registers knowledge, and other things. Anyway, it is just a suggestion.

CYDONIA, you have a good number of programmers in Turkey, or is turkish spoken in other country other than Turkey?

Ah k0d, a hello world:




0D9D:0100 jmp 010E
0D9D:0102 db "Hello world" "$"
0D9D:010E mov dx,0102
0D9D:0111 mov ah,09
0D9D:0113 int 21
0D9D:0115 int 20
0D9D:0117



More questions always appreciated!!
Posted on 2002-01-23 18:51:10 by CodeLover
Hi,

CodeLover very right,

you must start numbers (bin,hex), registers, segment-offset, and asm opcodes. i first start asm with dos debug. some little trys and research. asm learning not difficult.


CYDONIA, you have a good number of programmers in Turkey, or is turkish spoken in other country other than Turkey?

yes, in Turkey and all Metropolis citys have good programmers, but last years, and currently programmed only in Turkish programming sectors (some exporting outside). i created and started only turkish language forums for to contribute this subject. thanks for interest.


[ Excuse me for my bad english :) ]

Have Nice Days,
Posted on 2002-01-24 05:35:35 by CYDONIA
Just be careful wasting your time in DOS, it is effectively useless in modern programming as it has nothing like the power of 32 bit assembler in windows. Memory limitations, instruction limits, speed limitations etc ....

If you can get the very basics of writing assembler, start on 32 bit as its simpler, clearer and a lot faster. It can handle far larger amounts of memory and at much higher speed.

Learning segment/offset programming is like learning to tune a Fokker Biplane in a world of high speed jets, maybe interesting and time consuming but absolutely useless.

Regards,

hutch@movsd.com
Posted on 2002-01-24 05:54:43 by hutch--

Learning segment/offset programming is like learning to tune a Fokker Biplane in a world of high speed jets, maybe interesting and time consuming but absolutely useless.


hutch,

Actually, the segments exist and the offsets also. In Win32ASM compilers it has been replaced by "literal words" like MsgCaption db "blablabla",0, but it continues being a memory offset. Understanding memory offsets and segments will help you program better, and as a consequence, you can avoid questions such as: What do i use here, offset or addr?, or Does this go between brackets?.

And also, hutch, if you wanna study aeronautics engineering, where you are going to design "high speed jets" you will have to study the first motors.

Can you learn to write without being able to read?
Posted on 2002-01-24 06:30:15 by CodeLover
Hutch is right. Starting with DOS is just about useless, and will
only help to confuse yourself. Yes, you do need to learn about offsets,
the hexadecimal number system and whatnot, but there's no reason
to learn about segment crap, the DOS multiplex API, and being stuck
with the confines of 16bit adressing.
Posted on 2002-01-24 06:55:23 by f0dder
You are right f0dder. But when it comes to learning about offsets or some instructions is good and pretty fast to test it using, for example, DOS debug. I am not saying he has to create a game or an encryption utility for DOS. Maybe write a few lines under DOS can help you understand more about all this.
Posted on 2002-01-24 07:13:02 by CodeLover
I agree with Hutch, look at: Randall Hyde's,
The Art of Assembly Language Programming,
http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/Page_asm/0_Page_asm.html
for the basic's, then move to Windows----
B
Posted on 2002-01-24 07:27:08 by BradB